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Article: Functional characterization of various algal carotenoid ketolases reveals that ketolating zeaxanthin efficiently is essential for high production of astaxanthin in transgenic Arabidopsis

TitleFunctional characterization of various algal carotenoid ketolases reveals that ketolating zeaxanthin efficiently is essential for high production of astaxanthin in transgenic Arabidopsis
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Journal Of Experimental Botany, 2011, v. 62 n. 10, p. 3659-3669 How to Cite?
AbstractExtending the carotenoid pathway to astaxanthin in plants is of scientific and industrial interest. However, expression of a microbial β-carotene ketolase (BKT) that catalyses the formation of ketocarotenoids in transgenic plants typically results in low levels of astaxanthin. The low efficiency of BKTs in ketolating zeaxanthin to astaxanthin is proposed to be the major limitation for astaxanthin accumulation in engineered plants. To verify this hypothesis, several algal BKTs were functionally characterized using an Escherichia coli system and three BKTs were identified, with high (up to 85%), moderate (∼38%), and low (∼1%) conversion rate from zeaxanthin to astaxanthin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrBKT), Chlorella zofingiensis (CzBKT), and Haematococcus pluvialis (HpBKT3), respectively. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing the CrBKT developed orange leaves which accumulated astaxanthin up to 2 mg g -1 dry weight with a 1.8-fold increase in total carotenoids. In contrast, the expression of CzBKT resulted in much lower astaxanthin content (0.24 mg g -1 dry weight), whereas HpBKT3 was unable to mediate synthesis of astaxanthin in A. thaliana. The none-native astaxanthin was found mostly in a free form integrated into the light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II in young leaves but in esterified forms in senescent leaves. The alteration of carotenoids did not affect chlorophyll content, plant growth, or development significantly. The astaxanthin-producing plants were more tolerant to high light as shown by reduced lipid peroxidation. This study advances a decisive step towards the utilization of plants for the production of high-value astaxanthin. © 2011 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179240
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.677
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.798
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhong, YJen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, JCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, ZFen_US
dc.contributor.authorSandmann, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Experimental Botany, 2011, v. 62 n. 10, p. 3659-3669en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0957en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179240-
dc.description.abstractExtending the carotenoid pathway to astaxanthin in plants is of scientific and industrial interest. However, expression of a microbial β-carotene ketolase (BKT) that catalyses the formation of ketocarotenoids in transgenic plants typically results in low levels of astaxanthin. The low efficiency of BKTs in ketolating zeaxanthin to astaxanthin is proposed to be the major limitation for astaxanthin accumulation in engineered plants. To verify this hypothesis, several algal BKTs were functionally characterized using an Escherichia coli system and three BKTs were identified, with high (up to 85%), moderate (∼38%), and low (∼1%) conversion rate from zeaxanthin to astaxanthin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrBKT), Chlorella zofingiensis (CzBKT), and Haematococcus pluvialis (HpBKT3), respectively. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing the CrBKT developed orange leaves which accumulated astaxanthin up to 2 mg g -1 dry weight with a 1.8-fold increase in total carotenoids. In contrast, the expression of CzBKT resulted in much lower astaxanthin content (0.24 mg g -1 dry weight), whereas HpBKT3 was unable to mediate synthesis of astaxanthin in A. thaliana. The none-native astaxanthin was found mostly in a free form integrated into the light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II in young leaves but in esterified forms in senescent leaves. The alteration of carotenoids did not affect chlorophyll content, plant growth, or development significantly. The astaxanthin-producing plants were more tolerant to high light as shown by reduced lipid peroxidation. This study advances a decisive step towards the utilization of plants for the production of high-value astaxanthin. © 2011 The Author(s).en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Experimental Botanyen_US
dc.subject.meshArabidopsis - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshChlamydomonas - Enzymology - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshOxygenases - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshPlants, Genetically Modified - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshXanthophylls - Biosynthesis - Metabolismen_US
dc.titleFunctional characterization of various algal carotenoid ketolases reveals that ketolating zeaxanthin efficiently is essential for high production of astaxanthin in transgenic Arabidopsisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, JC: huangjc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, F: sfchen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHuang, JC=rp00710en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, F=rp00672en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jxb/err070en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21398427-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960220136en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960220136&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume62en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage3659en_US
dc.identifier.epage3669en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292557000032-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhong, YJ=36098711000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, JC=7408108735en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, J=36064082300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=8920079100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, Y=24605346600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, ZF=7405425506en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSandmann, G=7006654333en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, F=7404907980en_US

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