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Article: Diversity and abundance of nematode-trapping fungi from decaying litter in terrestrial, freshwater and mangrove habitats

TitleDiversity and abundance of nematode-trapping fungi from decaying litter in terrestrial, freshwater and mangrove habitats
Authors
KeywordsBiodiversity
Ecology
Mangrove Fungi
Marine Fungi
Nematode-Trapping Fungi
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0960-3115
Citation
Biodiversity And Conservation, 2009, v. 18 n. 6, p. 1695-1714 How to Cite?
AbstractNematode-trapping fungi are ubiquitous in terrestrial habitats in dung, soils, litter and woody debris and they also occur in freshwater, but only one species has been found in marine habitats. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether nematode-trapping fungi occurred in mangrove habitats. To achieve this we assessed the diversity of nematode-trapping fungi on decaying litter from mangroves, freshwater and terrestrial habitats (22 sites) in Hong Kong. Composite samples (n = 1,320) of decaying litter (wood and leaves) were examined and a total of 31 species of nematode-trapping fungi belonging to four genera, Arthrobotrys, Monacrosporium, and Dactylella were recorded. Twenty-nine species reported in this study are new records for Hong Kong and 16 species are new records from mangrove habitats worldwide. Nematode trapping fungi are therefore present in marine environments. Commonly encountered taxa were Arthrobotrys oligospora and Monacrosporium thaumasium which are abundant in all habitats. A. oligospora, M. thaumasium and Arthrobotrys musiformis were frequent (F > 10%). Twenty-six species were rare (0.16-9.32%). Species richness and diversity was higher in terrestrial than in freshwater and mangrove habitats (ANOVA, P < 0.001). A higher mean diversity was observed on decaying leaves as compared to decaying wood in all habitats (P < 0.001). Based on Shannon diversity index, it was also observed that taxa characterized by adhesive nets were more frequent in all habitats. This can be explained by the fact that these taxa may have a better competitive saprotrophic ability which would allow them to compete favourably in nutrient limited environments. Abiotic factors that could be linked to differences in species diversity between decaying wood and leaves are also discussed. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179137
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.258
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.248
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSwe, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorJeewon, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_US
dc.contributor.authorHyde, KDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:52:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:52:16Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationBiodiversity And Conservation, 2009, v. 18 n. 6, p. 1695-1714en_US
dc.identifier.issn0960-3115en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179137-
dc.description.abstractNematode-trapping fungi are ubiquitous in terrestrial habitats in dung, soils, litter and woody debris and they also occur in freshwater, but only one species has been found in marine habitats. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether nematode-trapping fungi occurred in mangrove habitats. To achieve this we assessed the diversity of nematode-trapping fungi on decaying litter from mangroves, freshwater and terrestrial habitats (22 sites) in Hong Kong. Composite samples (n = 1,320) of decaying litter (wood and leaves) were examined and a total of 31 species of nematode-trapping fungi belonging to four genera, Arthrobotrys, Monacrosporium, and Dactylella were recorded. Twenty-nine species reported in this study are new records for Hong Kong and 16 species are new records from mangrove habitats worldwide. Nematode trapping fungi are therefore present in marine environments. Commonly encountered taxa were Arthrobotrys oligospora and Monacrosporium thaumasium which are abundant in all habitats. A. oligospora, M. thaumasium and Arthrobotrys musiformis were frequent (F > 10%). Twenty-six species were rare (0.16-9.32%). Species richness and diversity was higher in terrestrial than in freshwater and mangrove habitats (ANOVA, P < 0.001). A higher mean diversity was observed on decaying leaves as compared to decaying wood in all habitats (P < 0.001). Based on Shannon diversity index, it was also observed that taxa characterized by adhesive nets were more frequent in all habitats. This can be explained by the fact that these taxa may have a better competitive saprotrophic ability which would allow them to compete favourably in nutrient limited environments. Abiotic factors that could be linked to differences in species diversity between decaying wood and leaves are also discussed. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0960-3115en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBiodiversity and Conservationen_US
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.subjectMangrove Fungien_US
dc.subjectMarine Fungien_US
dc.subjectNematode-Trapping Fungien_US
dc.titleDiversity and abundance of nematode-trapping fungi from decaying litter in terrestrial, freshwater and mangrove habitatsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10531-008-9553-7en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67349203960en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67349203960&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1695en_US
dc.identifier.epage1714en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSwe, A=24605771300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJeewon, R=6602641191en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHyde, KD=7102588111en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike3785038-

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