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Article: Feeding physiology of the carnivorous gastropod Thais clavigera (Kuster): Do they eat "soup"?

TitleFeeding physiology of the carnivorous gastropod Thais clavigera (Kuster): Do they eat "soup"?
Authors
KeywordsDissolved Organic Matters
Eutrophication
Nucella Lapillus
Particulate Organic Matters
Seston
Whelk
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jembe
Citation
Journal Of Experimental Marine Biology And Ecology, 2004, v. 312 n. 1, p. 43-66 How to Cite?
AbstractThe ability to feed on suspended and dissolved organic nutrients may have been retained in predatory gastropods during evolution. The carnivorous muricid neogastropod Thais clavigera feeds on prey by boring through their shells, followed by extracellular digestion and suction of the nutrient-rich fluid of the prey's body tissues. This study reports on the effect of feeding on suspended and soluble organic nutrients (SSONs) on the survival, growth, and various physiological activities including scope for growth and glycogen stores of T. clavigera. Juvenile T. clavigera of similar shell length (23.8±1.7 mm) were either starved, fed with mussel Septifer virgatus, fed with SSONs from homogenized mussel flesh (S. virgatus), or fed with both mussels and SSONs, and kept in artificial seawater (salinity: 30‰) for 50 days. Ingestion of SSONs by the animals was significant. Feeding with the "soup" (i.e., SSONs) reduced tissue wastage and improved condition index of the snails. T. clavigera fed in this manner were intermediates between the starved and the mussel-fed groups in terms of mortality, growth, food consumption, respiration, scope for growth, and glycogen content measurements. Furthermore, T. clavigera fed with both mussels and SSONs exhibited an identical energy requirement and similar values of various physiological measurements as that of those fed solely on mussel flesh. Feeding of SSONs contributed >10% of the overall energy requirement when both SSONs and mussel prey were available. The results indicate that energy from suspended and dissolved organic nutrients can contribute to the maximization of energy input in T. clavigera, which may favor better survivorship and thus lifetime fitness. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179062
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.796
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.029
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, DCPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:51:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:51:42Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Experimental Marine Biology And Ecology, 2004, v. 312 n. 1, p. 43-66en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0981en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179062-
dc.description.abstractThe ability to feed on suspended and dissolved organic nutrients may have been retained in predatory gastropods during evolution. The carnivorous muricid neogastropod Thais clavigera feeds on prey by boring through their shells, followed by extracellular digestion and suction of the nutrient-rich fluid of the prey's body tissues. This study reports on the effect of feeding on suspended and soluble organic nutrients (SSONs) on the survival, growth, and various physiological activities including scope for growth and glycogen stores of T. clavigera. Juvenile T. clavigera of similar shell length (23.8±1.7 mm) were either starved, fed with mussel Septifer virgatus, fed with SSONs from homogenized mussel flesh (S. virgatus), or fed with both mussels and SSONs, and kept in artificial seawater (salinity: 30‰) for 50 days. Ingestion of SSONs by the animals was significant. Feeding with the "soup" (i.e., SSONs) reduced tissue wastage and improved condition index of the snails. T. clavigera fed in this manner were intermediates between the starved and the mussel-fed groups in terms of mortality, growth, food consumption, respiration, scope for growth, and glycogen content measurements. Furthermore, T. clavigera fed with both mussels and SSONs exhibited an identical energy requirement and similar values of various physiological measurements as that of those fed solely on mussel flesh. Feeding of SSONs contributed >10% of the overall energy requirement when both SSONs and mussel prey were available. The results indicate that energy from suspended and dissolved organic nutrients can contribute to the maximization of energy input in T. clavigera, which may favor better survivorship and thus lifetime fitness. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jembeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecologyen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. Copyright © Elsevier BV.-
dc.subjectDissolved Organic Mattersen_US
dc.subjectEutrophicationen_US
dc.subjectNucella Lapillusen_US
dc.subjectParticulate Organic Mattersen_US
dc.subjectSestonen_US
dc.subjectWhelken_US
dc.titleFeeding physiology of the carnivorous gastropod Thais clavigera (Kuster): Do they eat "soup"?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jembe.2004.06.002en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4644356368en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros97958-
dc.identifier.hkuros157466-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4644356368&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume312en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage43en_US
dc.identifier.epage66en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224506000004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, DCP=23089080800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KMY=7401860738en_US

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