File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Toxicities of antifouling biocide Irgarol 1051 and its major degraded product to marine primary producers

TitleToxicities of antifouling biocide Irgarol 1051 and its major degraded product to marine primary producers
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/marpolbul
Citation
Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2008, v. 57 n. 6-12, p. 575-586 How to Cite?
AbstractIrgarol 1051 (2-methythiol-4-tert-butylamino-6-cyclopropylamino-s-triazine) is an algaecide commonly used in antifouling paints. It undergoes photodegradation which yields M1 (2-methylthio-4-tert-butylamino-6-amino-s-triazine) as its major and most stable degradant. Elevated levels of both Irgarol and M1 have been detected in coastal waters worldwide; however, ecotoxicity effects of M1 to various marine autotrophs such as cyanobacteria are still largely unknown. This study firstly examined and compared the 96 h toxicities of Irgarol and M1 to the cyanobacterium Chroococcus minor and two marine diatom species, Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Our results suggested that Irgarol was consistently more toxic to all of the three species than M1 (96 h EC50 values: C. minor, 7.71 μg L-1 Irgarol vs. >200 μg L-1 M1; S. costatum, 0.29 μg L-1 Irgarol vs. 11.32 μg L-1 M1; and T. pseudonana, 0.41 μg L-1 Irgarol vs. 16.50 μg L-1 M1). Secondly, we conducted a meta-analysis of currently available data on toxicities of Irgarol and M1 to both freshwater and marine primary producers based on species sensitivity distributions (SSDs). Interestingly, freshwater autotrophs are more sensitive to Irgarol than their marine counterparts. For marine autotrophs, microalgae are generally more sensitive to Irgarol than macroalgae and cyanobacteria. With very limited available data on M1 (i.e. five species), M1 might be less toxic than Irgarol; nonetheless this finding warrants further confirmation with additional data on other autotrophic species. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179058
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.099
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.264
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, AQen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwok, KWHen_US
dc.contributor.authorBao, VWWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, MHWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:51:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:51:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationMarine Pollution Bulletin, 2008, v. 57 n. 6-12, p. 575-586en_US
dc.identifier.issn0025-326Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179058-
dc.description.abstractIrgarol 1051 (2-methythiol-4-tert-butylamino-6-cyclopropylamino-s-triazine) is an algaecide commonly used in antifouling paints. It undergoes photodegradation which yields M1 (2-methylthio-4-tert-butylamino-6-amino-s-triazine) as its major and most stable degradant. Elevated levels of both Irgarol and M1 have been detected in coastal waters worldwide; however, ecotoxicity effects of M1 to various marine autotrophs such as cyanobacteria are still largely unknown. This study firstly examined and compared the 96 h toxicities of Irgarol and M1 to the cyanobacterium Chroococcus minor and two marine diatom species, Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Our results suggested that Irgarol was consistently more toxic to all of the three species than M1 (96 h EC50 values: C. minor, 7.71 μg L-1 Irgarol vs. >200 μg L-1 M1; S. costatum, 0.29 μg L-1 Irgarol vs. 11.32 μg L-1 M1; and T. pseudonana, 0.41 μg L-1 Irgarol vs. 16.50 μg L-1 M1). Secondly, we conducted a meta-analysis of currently available data on toxicities of Irgarol and M1 to both freshwater and marine primary producers based on species sensitivity distributions (SSDs). Interestingly, freshwater autotrophs are more sensitive to Irgarol than their marine counterparts. For marine autotrophs, microalgae are generally more sensitive to Irgarol than macroalgae and cyanobacteria. With very limited available data on M1 (i.e. five species), M1 might be less toxic than Irgarol; nonetheless this finding warrants further confirmation with additional data on other autotrophic species. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/marpolbulen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Pollution Bulletinen_US
dc.subject.meshCyanobacteria - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshDiatoms - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshDisinfectants - Metabolism - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshMarine Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSpecies Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshTriazines - Metabolism - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshWater Pollutants, Chemical - Metabolism - Toxicityen_US
dc.titleToxicities of antifouling biocide Irgarol 1051 and its major degraded product to marine primary producersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.marpolbul.2008.01.021en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18314144-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-45049085563en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros145412-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-45049085563&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume57en_US
dc.identifier.issue6-12en_US
dc.identifier.spage575en_US
dc.identifier.epage586en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257816300045-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, AQ=23669449500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KMY=7401860738en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, KWH=19337480200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBao, VWW=23666277800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, MHW=7202630175en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats