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Article: Impact of tail-nipping on mortality, growth and reproduction of Arenicola marina

TitleImpact of tail-nipping on mortality, growth and reproduction of Arenicola marina
Authors
Issue Date1988
Citation
Netherlands Journal Of Sea Research, 1988, v. 22 n. 1, p. 83-90 How to Cite?
AbstractThe impact of predation by amputation of regenerating body parts (tail tips) of the lugworm Arenicola marina on species mortality, growth and reproduction has been studied under laboratory conditions by the artificial removal of tail tips at different frequencies. The loss of body weight by amputation was not compensated for by an increased growth. Within a wide range of amputation frequencies, total growth (body growth + amount of tail tip amputated) and reproduction of the lugworm were not affected. Also, both egg development and amount of energy stored in reproduction remained the same. Only at the highest frequency of amputation (once a week) did total growth decrease in the course of time, resulting even in a loss of body weight. The amount of energy stored in reproduction was also significantly less at the highest rate of amputation. Lugworms appeared to be unable to sustain this high level of amputation and the anaerobic sediment conditions in the cuvettes suggest a reduced pumping activity and food intake. Mortality in this group was also higher than in the other groups. The consequences of tail-nipping by flatfish for A. marina in the field situation are discussed. © 1988.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179037
ISSN
1997 Impact Factor: 0.885

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBergman, MJNen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Veer, HWen_US
dc.contributor.authorKarczmarski, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:51:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:51:34Z-
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.identifier.citationNetherlands Journal Of Sea Research, 1988, v. 22 n. 1, p. 83-90en_US
dc.identifier.issn0077-7579en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179037-
dc.description.abstractThe impact of predation by amputation of regenerating body parts (tail tips) of the lugworm Arenicola marina on species mortality, growth and reproduction has been studied under laboratory conditions by the artificial removal of tail tips at different frequencies. The loss of body weight by amputation was not compensated for by an increased growth. Within a wide range of amputation frequencies, total growth (body growth + amount of tail tip amputated) and reproduction of the lugworm were not affected. Also, both egg development and amount of energy stored in reproduction remained the same. Only at the highest frequency of amputation (once a week) did total growth decrease in the course of time, resulting even in a loss of body weight. The amount of energy stored in reproduction was also significantly less at the highest rate of amputation. Lugworms appeared to be unable to sustain this high level of amputation and the anaerobic sediment conditions in the cuvettes suggest a reduced pumping activity and food intake. Mortality in this group was also higher than in the other groups. The consequences of tail-nipping by flatfish for A. marina in the field situation are discussed. © 1988.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNetherlands Journal of Sea Researchen_US
dc.titleImpact of tail-nipping on mortality, growth and reproduction of Arenicola marinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKarczmarski, L: leszek@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKarczmarski, L=rp00713en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38249032472en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage83en_US
dc.identifier.epage90en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBergman, MJN=7102272995en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Der Veer, HW=7003376102en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarczmarski, L=6603422145en_US

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