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Article: Characterization of aerobic bacteria involved in degrading polyethylene glycol (PEG)-3400 obtained by plating and enrichment culture techniques

TitleCharacterization of aerobic bacteria involved in degrading polyethylene glycol (PEG)-3400 obtained by plating and enrichment culture techniques
Authors
KeywordsAerobic Degradation
Culturability
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Polyethylene Glycol
Issue Date2007
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1566-2543
Citation
Journal Of Polymers And The Environment, 2007, v. 15 n. 1, p. 57-65 How to Cite?
AbstractPolyethylene glycol (PEG) 3400-degrading aerobic bacteria were isolated from tap water and wetland sediments and then characterized. Only one Sphingomonas strain was obtained in enrichment cultures from each inoculum source whereas a total of 15 bacterial strains were isolated on agar plates. Nine of the 15 isolates were confirmed as PEG 3400 degraders. Three of the 9 PEG 3400 degraders were Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas and genus Sphingomonas. The remaining six isolates were Gram-positive bacteria belonging to genera Rhodococcus, Williamsia, Mycobacterium and Bacillus. PEG 3400 was quantified at 194 nm spectrophotometrically and, at the same time, the growth of two Gram-negative (isolates P1 and P7) and five Gram-positive (isolates P2, P3, P4, P5 and P6) PEG 3400-degrading bacteria were assayed in liquid media and on agar plates amended with PEG 3400, and also on Nutrient Agar plates and pure agar plates without PEG 3400 addition. No growth was observed on the pure agar plates for all the tested strains for a period of 31 days. All tested PEG 3400 degraders showed much lower viability in liquid culture than on the corresponding agar plates in the presence of PEG 3400. Two Gram-negative isolates P1 and P7 did not show significant growth advantage over the Gram-positive isolates both on the agar plates and in the liquid medium amended with PEG 3400. Our results suggest that diversity of PEG degrading bacteria is high in the environments and culturing techniques affect the successful isolation of the bacteria responsible for degradation. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178982
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.969
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.648
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPan, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:51:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:51:14Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Polymers And The Environment, 2007, v. 15 n. 1, p. 57-65en_US
dc.identifier.issn1566-2543en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178982-
dc.description.abstractPolyethylene glycol (PEG) 3400-degrading aerobic bacteria were isolated from tap water and wetland sediments and then characterized. Only one Sphingomonas strain was obtained in enrichment cultures from each inoculum source whereas a total of 15 bacterial strains were isolated on agar plates. Nine of the 15 isolates were confirmed as PEG 3400 degraders. Three of the 9 PEG 3400 degraders were Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas and genus Sphingomonas. The remaining six isolates were Gram-positive bacteria belonging to genera Rhodococcus, Williamsia, Mycobacterium and Bacillus. PEG 3400 was quantified at 194 nm spectrophotometrically and, at the same time, the growth of two Gram-negative (isolates P1 and P7) and five Gram-positive (isolates P2, P3, P4, P5 and P6) PEG 3400-degrading bacteria were assayed in liquid media and on agar plates amended with PEG 3400, and also on Nutrient Agar plates and pure agar plates without PEG 3400 addition. No growth was observed on the pure agar plates for all the tested strains for a period of 31 days. All tested PEG 3400 degraders showed much lower viability in liquid culture than on the corresponding agar plates in the presence of PEG 3400. Two Gram-negative isolates P1 and P7 did not show significant growth advantage over the Gram-positive isolates both on the agar plates and in the liquid medium amended with PEG 3400. Our results suggest that diversity of PEG degrading bacteria is high in the environments and culturing techniques affect the successful isolation of the bacteria responsible for degradation. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1566-2543en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Polymers and the Environmenten_US
dc.subjectAerobic Degradationen_US
dc.subjectCulturabilityen_US
dc.subjectGram-Positive Bacteriaen_US
dc.subjectPolyethylene Glycolen_US
dc.titleCharacterization of aerobic bacteria involved in degrading polyethylene glycol (PEG)-3400 obtained by plating and enrichment culture techniquesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10924-006-0047-yen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33847093415en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros134297-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33847093415&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage57en_US
dc.identifier.epage65en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244300400008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPan, L=54393873900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1167241-

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