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Article: Application of near-infrared spectroscopy in quality control and determination of adulteration of african essential oils

TitleApplication of near-infrared spectroscopy in quality control and determination of adulteration of african essential oils
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5152
Citation
Phytochemical Analysis, 2006, v. 17 n. 2, p. 121-128 How to Cite?
AbstractAn evaluation has been made of the potential of near-infrared (NIR) technologies in the assessment of essential oil components and in the identification of individual essential oils. The results showed that cross-validation models are able to predict accurately almost all of the components of essential oils. In different cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) and clove (Syzygium aromaticum) essential oils, which showed a similar composition, 23 components (representing 97.8-99.9% of the oil) were accurately predicted, as well as 20 components (93.0-99.1%) in Cinnamomum camphora (ravintsara), 32 components (92.3-98.1%) in Ravensara aromatica (ravensara), and 26 components (96.6-98.4%) in Lippia multiflora. For almost all of the components, the modelled and reference values obtained by GC-FID were highly correlated (r2 ≥ 0.985) and exhibited a low variance (less than 5%). The model was also able to discriminate between the ravintsara and ravensara essential oils. It was shown that two commercial oils labelled as R. aromatica were actually ravintsara (C. camphora), revealing the misidentification of these essential oils in the marketplace. The study demonstrates the application of NIR technology as a quality control tool for the rapid identification of individual essential oils, for product authentication, and for the detection of adulteration. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178936
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.497
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.855
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJuliani, HRen_US
dc.contributor.authorKapteyn, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorKoroch, ARen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorCharles, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSimon, JEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:50:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:50:51Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationPhytochemical Analysis, 2006, v. 17 n. 2, p. 121-128en_US
dc.identifier.issn0958-0344en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178936-
dc.description.abstractAn evaluation has been made of the potential of near-infrared (NIR) technologies in the assessment of essential oil components and in the identification of individual essential oils. The results showed that cross-validation models are able to predict accurately almost all of the components of essential oils. In different cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) and clove (Syzygium aromaticum) essential oils, which showed a similar composition, 23 components (representing 97.8-99.9% of the oil) were accurately predicted, as well as 20 components (93.0-99.1%) in Cinnamomum camphora (ravintsara), 32 components (92.3-98.1%) in Ravensara aromatica (ravensara), and 26 components (96.6-98.4%) in Lippia multiflora. For almost all of the components, the modelled and reference values obtained by GC-FID were highly correlated (r2 ≥ 0.985) and exhibited a low variance (less than 5%). The model was also able to discriminate between the ravintsara and ravensara essential oils. It was shown that two commercial oils labelled as R. aromatica were actually ravintsara (C. camphora), revealing the misidentification of these essential oils in the marketplace. The study demonstrates the application of NIR technology as a quality control tool for the rapid identification of individual essential oils, for product authentication, and for the detection of adulteration. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5152en_US
dc.relation.ispartofPhytochemical Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshAfricaen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Contaminationen_US
dc.subject.meshEugenia - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshLauraceae - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshLippia - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPlant Oils - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshQuality Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshSpectrophotometry, Infrared - Methodsen_US
dc.titleApplication of near-infrared spectroscopy in quality control and determination of adulteration of african essential oilsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, M: mfwang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00800en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pca.895en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16634289-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645556572en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645556572&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage121en_US
dc.identifier.epage128en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236695500008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJuliani, HR=14521146400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKapteyn, J=6701450591en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, D=12801529400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoroch, AR=6507087232en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=7406691844en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCharles, D=7102209731en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSimon, JE=7403956069en_US

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