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Article: Two strategies to identify genes underlying complex diseases

TitleTwo strategies to identify genes underlying complex diseases
Authors
KeywordsComplex Disease
Gene Identification
Microarray
Obesity
Proteomics
Issue Date2005
PublisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/cg/index.htm
Citation
Current Genomics, 2005, v. 6 n. 7, p. 551-561 How to Cite?
AbstractDissecting the genetic basis of complex diseases remains one of great challenges in human genetics, because these diseases have polygenic determinations and involve multiple gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions. Definite conclusions about finding genes underlying complex diseases need substantial evidence from three levels of gene function. The traditional strategy of gene identification is to determine putative susceptibility genes on the DNA level, and then to find related association between susceptibility genes and complex diseases on the RNA and protein levels. However, with rapid development of technologies of proteomics and microarrays, a new high-throughput strategy backward from protein to RNA and further to DNA becomes available for gene discovery. This strategy can systemically test gene expression, analyze co-expressed genes or regulatory network, and detect the effects of environmental factors on the onset and development of complex diseases. Here we attempt to outline these two strategies using obesity as an example of a complex disease, and to compare their advantages and disadvantages. In conclusion, we suggest that these two strategies may complement each other and thus help to uncover a more comprehensively and more completely multifaceted spectrum of genetic determination for complex diseases. © 2005 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178920
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.43
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.387
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLei, SFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorDvornyk, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorDeng, HWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:50:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:50:44Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Genomics, 2005, v. 6 n. 7, p. 551-561en_US
dc.identifier.issn1389-2029en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178920-
dc.description.abstractDissecting the genetic basis of complex diseases remains one of great challenges in human genetics, because these diseases have polygenic determinations and involve multiple gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions. Definite conclusions about finding genes underlying complex diseases need substantial evidence from three levels of gene function. The traditional strategy of gene identification is to determine putative susceptibility genes on the DNA level, and then to find related association between susceptibility genes and complex diseases on the RNA and protein levels. However, with rapid development of technologies of proteomics and microarrays, a new high-throughput strategy backward from protein to RNA and further to DNA becomes available for gene discovery. This strategy can systemically test gene expression, analyze co-expressed genes or regulatory network, and detect the effects of environmental factors on the onset and development of complex diseases. Here we attempt to outline these two strategies using obesity as an example of a complex disease, and to compare their advantages and disadvantages. In conclusion, we suggest that these two strategies may complement each other and thus help to uncover a more comprehensively and more completely multifaceted spectrum of genetic determination for complex diseases. © 2005 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/cg/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Genomicsen_US
dc.subjectComplex Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectGene Identificationen_US
dc.subjectMicroarrayen_US
dc.subjectObesityen_US
dc.subjectProteomicsen_US
dc.titleTwo strategies to identify genes underlying complex diseasesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDvornyk, V: dvornyk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDvornyk, V=rp00693en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2174/138920205775067710en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-29944445973en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-29944445973&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage551en_US
dc.identifier.epage561en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234101100007-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLei, SF=7102453442en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, S=37029336900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDvornyk, V=6701789786en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeng, HW=34568563000en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike435182-

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