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Article: Race and sex differences and contribution of height: A study on bone size in healthy Caucasians and Chinese

TitleRace and sex differences and contribution of height: A study on bone size in healthy Caucasians and Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/
Citation
American Journal Of Human Biology, 2005, v. 17 n. 5, p. 568-575 How to Cite?
AbstractOsteoporosis is characterized by a loss of bone strength, of which bone size (BS) is an important determinant. However, studies on the factors determining BS are relatively few. The present study evaluated the independent effects of height, age, weight, sex, and race on areal BS at the hip and spine, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, while focusing on the differential contributions of height to BS across sex, race, and skeletal site. The subjects were aged 40 years or older, including 763 Chinese (384 males and 379 females) from Shanghai, People's Republic of China, and 424 Caucasians (188 males and 236 females) from Omaha, Nebraska. Basically, Caucasians had significantly larger BS than Chinese. After adjusting for height, age, and weight, the Chinese had similar spine BS, but significantly larger intertrochanter BS in both sexes and larger total hip BS in females compared with Caucasians. Males had significantly larger BS than females before and after adjustment in both ethnic groups. The effects of age, weight, and race varied, depending on skeletal site. As expected, height had major effects on BS variation in both sexes and races. Height tended to account for larger BS variation at the spine than at the hip (except for Chinese females), and larger BS variation in Caucasians than in Chinese of the same sex (except for the trochanter in females). We conclude that height is a major predictor for BS, and its contributions vary across sex, race, and skeletal site. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178914
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.875
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.018
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, YYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, PYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavies, KMen_US
dc.contributor.authorDvornyk, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorRecker, RRen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeng, HWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:50:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:50:42Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Human Biology, 2005, v. 17 n. 5, p. 568-575en_US
dc.identifier.issn1042-0533en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178914-
dc.description.abstractOsteoporosis is characterized by a loss of bone strength, of which bone size (BS) is an important determinant. However, studies on the factors determining BS are relatively few. The present study evaluated the independent effects of height, age, weight, sex, and race on areal BS at the hip and spine, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, while focusing on the differential contributions of height to BS across sex, race, and skeletal site. The subjects were aged 40 years or older, including 763 Chinese (384 males and 379 females) from Shanghai, People's Republic of China, and 424 Caucasians (188 males and 236 females) from Omaha, Nebraska. Basically, Caucasians had significantly larger BS than Chinese. After adjusting for height, age, and weight, the Chinese had similar spine BS, but significantly larger intertrochanter BS in both sexes and larger total hip BS in females compared with Caucasians. Males had significantly larger BS than females before and after adjustment in both ethnic groups. The effects of age, weight, and race varied, depending on skeletal site. As expected, height had major effects on BS variation in both sexes and races. Height tended to account for larger BS variation at the spine than at the hip (except for Chinese females), and larger BS variation in Caucasians than in Chinese of the same sex (except for the trochanter in females). We conclude that height is a major predictor for BS, and its contributions vary across sex, race, and skeletal site. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Human Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAbsorptiometry, Photonen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Size - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBone And Bones - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFemur - Physiology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshHip - Physiology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLumbar Vertebrae - Physiology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNebraskaen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteoporosis - Genetics - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.titleRace and sex differences and contribution of height: A study on bone size in healthy Caucasians and Chineseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDvornyk, V: dvornyk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDvornyk, V=rp00693en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajhb.20427en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16136538-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-28044472768en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-28044472768&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage568en_US
dc.identifier.epage575en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231655700003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, YY=12781205700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, PY=7404618030en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, Y=26321148700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDavies, KM=8094376800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDvornyk, V=6701789786en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRecker, RR=7007086875en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeng, HW=34568563000en_US

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