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Article: Aflatoxin B1 binding by a mixture of Lactobacillus and Propionibacterium: In vitro versus ex vivo

TitleAflatoxin B1 binding by a mixture of Lactobacillus and Propionibacterium: In vitro versus ex vivo
Authors
Issue Date2005
Citation
Journal Of Food Protection, 2005, v. 68 n. 11, p. 2470-2474 How to Cite?
AbstractAflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a well-known carcinogen and reducing its bioavailability is of great interest for human and animal health. Several probiotic bacteria are able to bind AFB1 in vitro, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus LC-705 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii JS. A mixture of these two probiotics is used by the food and feed industry as biopreservative (Bioprofit), making it a promising candidate for future applications. Consequently, this study aims to investigate the in vitro and ex vivo ability of this probiotic mixture to bind AFB1. For in vitro experiments, probiotic mixture was suspended in an AFB1 solution (5 μM), incubated for 1 to 30 min, centrifuged, and AFB1 residues were quantitated in supernatant and pellet. For ex vivo experiments, duodenal loops of chicks were ligated and injected with either AFB1 solution alone or probiotic mixture suspension and AFB1 solution. Lumen content was centrifuged and AFB1 was quantitated in supernatant and pellet. Additionally, AFB1 was extracted from duodenal tissue to calculate tissue uptake. In vitro, 57 to 66% of AFB1 was removed from the solution by the probiotic mixture, but only 38 to 47% could be extracted from the bacterial surface. In ex vivo experiments, only up to 25% of AFB1 was bound by bacteria, and tissue uptake of AFB1 was significantly reduced when probiotic bacteria were present in the duodenal loop. Furthermore, the effect of intestinal mucus on the bacterial binding ability was investigated in vitro and was found to significantly reduce AFB1 binding by the probiotic mixture. However, probiotic mixture could only retard but not prevent AFB1 absorption in duodenal loops. Further work needs to assess the potential of probiotics in different experimental setups. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178911
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.609
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.966
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGratz, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorMykkänen, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorElNezami, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:50:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:50:40Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Food Protection, 2005, v. 68 n. 11, p. 2470-2474en_US
dc.identifier.issn0362-028Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178911-
dc.description.abstractAflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a well-known carcinogen and reducing its bioavailability is of great interest for human and animal health. Several probiotic bacteria are able to bind AFB1 in vitro, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus LC-705 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii JS. A mixture of these two probiotics is used by the food and feed industry as biopreservative (Bioprofit), making it a promising candidate for future applications. Consequently, this study aims to investigate the in vitro and ex vivo ability of this probiotic mixture to bind AFB1. For in vitro experiments, probiotic mixture was suspended in an AFB1 solution (5 μM), incubated for 1 to 30 min, centrifuged, and AFB1 residues were quantitated in supernatant and pellet. For ex vivo experiments, duodenal loops of chicks were ligated and injected with either AFB1 solution alone or probiotic mixture suspension and AFB1 solution. Lumen content was centrifuged and AFB1 was quantitated in supernatant and pellet. Additionally, AFB1 was extracted from duodenal tissue to calculate tissue uptake. In vitro, 57 to 66% of AFB1 was removed from the solution by the probiotic mixture, but only 38 to 47% could be extracted from the bacterial surface. In ex vivo experiments, only up to 25% of AFB1 was bound by bacteria, and tissue uptake of AFB1 was significantly reduced when probiotic bacteria were present in the duodenal loop. Furthermore, the effect of intestinal mucus on the bacterial binding ability was investigated in vitro and was found to significantly reduce AFB1 binding by the probiotic mixture. However, probiotic mixture could only retard but not prevent AFB1 absorption in duodenal loops. Further work needs to assess the potential of probiotics in different experimental setups. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Food Protectionen_US
dc.subject.meshAflatoxin B1 - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshChickens - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChromatography, High Pressure Liquiden_US
dc.subject.meshDuodenum - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFood Preservation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshLactobacillus - Metabolism - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPoisonsen_US
dc.subject.meshProbioticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPropionibacterium - Metabolism - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRandom Allocationen_US
dc.titleAflatoxin B1 binding by a mixture of Lactobacillus and Propionibacterium: In vitro versus ex vivoen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailElNezami, H: elnezami@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityElNezami, H=rp00694en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid16300092-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27744522213en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27744522213&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume68en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage2470en_US
dc.identifier.epage2474en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233096200033-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGratz, S=9242677500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMykkänen, H=7003915985en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridElNezami, H=6603690577en_US

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