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Article: Spinner dolphins in a remote Hawaiian atoll: Social grouping and population structure

TitleSpinner dolphins in a remote Hawaiian atoll: Social grouping and population structure
Authors
KeywordsGeographic Insularity/Connectivity
Group Dynamics
Hawaii
Midway Atoll
Social Evolution
Social Structure
Spinner Dolphin Stenella Longirostris
Issue Date2005
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://beheco.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Behavioral Ecology, 2005, v. 16 n. 4, p. 675-685 How to Cite?
AbstractSpinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) commonly use inshore island and atoll habitats for daytime rest and social interactions and forage over deep waters at night. In Hawaii, they occur throughout the archipelago. We applied photoidentification mark-recapture techniques to study the population structure of spinner dolphins associated with remote Midway Atoll, far-western Hawaii. At Midway, spinner dolphins live in stable bisexually bonded societies of long-term associates, with strong geographic fidelity, no obvious fission-fusion, and limited contacts with other populations. Their large cohesive groups change little over time and are behaviorally/socially discrete from other spinner dolphin groups. This social pattern differs considerably from the fluid fission-fusion model proposed previously for spinner dolphins associated with a large island habitat in the main Hawaiian Archipelago. These differences correspond to geographic separation and habitat variation. While in the main islands there are several daytime resting places available at each island habitat; in far-western Hawaii, areas of suitable habitat are limited and separated by large stretches of open pelagic waters with potentially high risk of shark predation. We hypothesize that with deepwater food resources in close proximity and other atolls relatively far away for easy (day-to-day) access, it is energetically more beneficial in the remote Hawaiian atolls to remain "at home" than to travel to other atolls, so there is stability instead of variability; there is no fission-fusion effect. Thus, the geographic isolation and small size of remote atolls trigger a process in which the fluidity of the fission-fusion spinner dolphin society is replaced with long-term group fidelity and social stability. © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178905
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.029
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.698
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKarczmarski, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorWürsig, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorGailey, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorLarson, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanderlip, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:50:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:50:37Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationBehavioral Ecology, 2005, v. 16 n. 4, p. 675-685en_US
dc.identifier.issn1045-2249en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178905-
dc.description.abstractSpinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) commonly use inshore island and atoll habitats for daytime rest and social interactions and forage over deep waters at night. In Hawaii, they occur throughout the archipelago. We applied photoidentification mark-recapture techniques to study the population structure of spinner dolphins associated with remote Midway Atoll, far-western Hawaii. At Midway, spinner dolphins live in stable bisexually bonded societies of long-term associates, with strong geographic fidelity, no obvious fission-fusion, and limited contacts with other populations. Their large cohesive groups change little over time and are behaviorally/socially discrete from other spinner dolphin groups. This social pattern differs considerably from the fluid fission-fusion model proposed previously for spinner dolphins associated with a large island habitat in the main Hawaiian Archipelago. These differences correspond to geographic separation and habitat variation. While in the main islands there are several daytime resting places available at each island habitat; in far-western Hawaii, areas of suitable habitat are limited and separated by large stretches of open pelagic waters with potentially high risk of shark predation. We hypothesize that with deepwater food resources in close proximity and other atolls relatively far away for easy (day-to-day) access, it is energetically more beneficial in the remote Hawaiian atolls to remain "at home" than to travel to other atolls, so there is stability instead of variability; there is no fission-fusion effect. Thus, the geographic isolation and small size of remote atolls trigger a process in which the fluidity of the fission-fusion spinner dolphin society is replaced with long-term group fidelity and social stability. © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://beheco.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBehavioral Ecologyen_US
dc.subjectGeographic Insularity/Connectivityen_US
dc.subjectGroup Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectHawaiien_US
dc.subjectMidway Atollen_US
dc.subjectSocial Evolutionen_US
dc.subjectSocial Structureen_US
dc.subjectSpinner Dolphin Stenella Longirostrisen_US
dc.titleSpinner dolphins in a remote Hawaiian atoll: Social grouping and population structureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKarczmarski, L: leszek@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKarczmarski, L=rp00713en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/beheco/ari028en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-25444503223en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-25444503223&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage675en_US
dc.identifier.epage685en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1465-7279-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229856900001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarczmarski, L=6603422145en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWürsig, B=7003268529en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGailey, G=8918247200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLarson, KW=12762633100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanderlip, C=8918247400en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike229260-

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