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Article: Genetic and environmental correlations between bone phenotypes and anthropometric indices in Chinese

TitleGenetic and environmental correlations between bone phenotypes and anthropometric indices in Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer U K. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/orthopedics/journal/198
Citation
Osteoporosis International, 2005, v. 16 n. 9, p. 1134-1140 How to Cite?
AbstractHeight, weight, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone size are all influenced by genetic and environmental factors as well as interactions between them. Height and weight are often used in population studies to adjust the bone phenotypes. However, it is still unknown what proportion of genetic and environmental variability is shared between these anthropometric characteristics and the bone phenotypes. The genetic and environmental correlations between the bone phenotypes and anthropometric indices in Chinese subjects were studied by bivariate quantitative genetic analysis on a sample of 931 healthy subjects from 292 Chinese nuclear families aged from 19 to 79 years. BMD and bone size at the lumbar spine (L1-L4) and the hip of all subjects were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We found significant genetic correlations between weight and spine BMD, hip BMD, spine bone size and hip bone size, which were 0.50 (P<0.01), 0.45 (P<0.01), 0.36 (P=0.02), and 0.38 (P<0.01), respectively. Likewise, significant genetic correlations between height and spine BMD, spine bone size, and hip bone size were 0.30 (P=0.02), 0.54 (P<0.01), and 0.58 (P<0.01), respectively. The environmental correlations were found to be significant only between height and spine bone size (P<0.001) and weight and hip BMD (P=0.02). These results suggest the probability that the same genetic and environmental factors contribute to these different phenotypes. Moreover, when a candidate gene or genomic region is responsible for the variation of both bone phenotypes and anthropometric indices, its true genetic effect on the bone phenotypes may be lost after one has adjusted the phenotypic values with weight and height as random environmental factors. It may have implications for population studies of candidate genes that underlie the complex bone phenotypes and for the development of strategies for therapeutic application. © International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178899
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.445
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.460
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, YJen_US
dc.contributor.authorDvornyk, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorJian, WXen_US
dc.contributor.authorXiao, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeng, HWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:50:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:50:34Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationOsteoporosis International, 2005, v. 16 n. 9, p. 1134-1140en_US
dc.identifier.issn0937-941Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178899-
dc.description.abstractHeight, weight, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone size are all influenced by genetic and environmental factors as well as interactions between them. Height and weight are often used in population studies to adjust the bone phenotypes. However, it is still unknown what proportion of genetic and environmental variability is shared between these anthropometric characteristics and the bone phenotypes. The genetic and environmental correlations between the bone phenotypes and anthropometric indices in Chinese subjects were studied by bivariate quantitative genetic analysis on a sample of 931 healthy subjects from 292 Chinese nuclear families aged from 19 to 79 years. BMD and bone size at the lumbar spine (L1-L4) and the hip of all subjects were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We found significant genetic correlations between weight and spine BMD, hip BMD, spine bone size and hip bone size, which were 0.50 (P<0.01), 0.45 (P<0.01), 0.36 (P=0.02), and 0.38 (P<0.01), respectively. Likewise, significant genetic correlations between height and spine BMD, spine bone size, and hip bone size were 0.30 (P=0.02), 0.54 (P<0.01), and 0.58 (P<0.01), respectively. The environmental correlations were found to be significant only between height and spine bone size (P<0.001) and weight and hip BMD (P=0.02). These results suggest the probability that the same genetic and environmental factors contribute to these different phenotypes. Moreover, when a candidate gene or genomic region is responsible for the variation of both bone phenotypes and anthropometric indices, its true genetic effect on the bone phenotypes may be lost after one has adjusted the phenotypic values with weight and height as random environmental factors. It may have implications for population studies of candidate genes that underlie the complex bone phenotypes and for the development of strategies for therapeutic application. © International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer U K. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/orthopedics/journal/198en_US
dc.relation.ispartofOsteoporosis Internationalen_US
dc.subject.meshAbsorptiometry, Photonen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAnthropometryen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Height - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Weight - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Density - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHip Joint - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLumbar Vertebrae - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPhenotypeen_US
dc.titleGenetic and environmental correlations between bone phenotypes and anthropometric indices in Chineseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDvornyk, V: dvornyk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDvornyk, V=rp00693en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00198-004-1825-9en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15711779-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-24044442935en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-24044442935&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage1134en_US
dc.identifier.epage1140en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231604500016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, YJ=23500643600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDvornyk, V=6701789786en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJian, WX=7005765053en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiao, SM=7402022586en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeng, HW=34568563000en_US

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