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Article: Cell wall proteomics of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chloroplyceae)

TitleCell wall proteomics of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chloroplyceae)
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherWiley - V C H Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley-vch.de/home/proteomics
Citation
Proteomics, 2004, v. 4 n. 3, p. 692-708 How to Cite?
AbstractThe green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis can synthesize and accumulate large amounts of the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin, and undergo profound changes in cell wall composition and architecture during the cell cycle and in response to environmental stresses. In this study, cell wall proteins (CWPs) of H. pluvialis were systematically analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and sequence-database analysis. In total, 163 protein bands were analyzed, which resulted in positive identification of 81 protein orthologues. The highly complex and dynamic composition of CWPs is manifested by the fact that the majority of identified CWPs are differentially expressed at specific stages of the cell cycle along with a number of common wall-associated 'housekeeping' proteins. The detection of cellulose synthase orthologue in the vegetative cells suggested that the biosynthesis of cellulose occurred during primary wall formation, in contrast to earlier observations that cellulose was exclusively present in the secondary wall of the organism. A transient accumulation of a putative cytokinin oxidase at the early stage of encystment pointed to a possible role in cytokinin degradation while facilitating secondary wall formation and/or assisting in cell expansion. This work represents the first attempt to use a proteomic approach to investigate CWPs of microalgae. The reference protein map constructed and the specific protein markers obtained from this study provide a framework for future characterization of the expression and physiological functions of the proteins involved in the biogenesis and modifications in the cell wall of Haematococcus and related organisms.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178865
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.079
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.476
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, SBen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorSommerfeld, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:50:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:50:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationProteomics, 2004, v. 4 n. 3, p. 692-708en_US
dc.identifier.issn1615-9853en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178865-
dc.description.abstractThe green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis can synthesize and accumulate large amounts of the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin, and undergo profound changes in cell wall composition and architecture during the cell cycle and in response to environmental stresses. In this study, cell wall proteins (CWPs) of H. pluvialis were systematically analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and sequence-database analysis. In total, 163 protein bands were analyzed, which resulted in positive identification of 81 protein orthologues. The highly complex and dynamic composition of CWPs is manifested by the fact that the majority of identified CWPs are differentially expressed at specific stages of the cell cycle along with a number of common wall-associated 'housekeeping' proteins. The detection of cellulose synthase orthologue in the vegetative cells suggested that the biosynthesis of cellulose occurred during primary wall formation, in contrast to earlier observations that cellulose was exclusively present in the secondary wall of the organism. A transient accumulation of a putative cytokinin oxidase at the early stage of encystment pointed to a possible role in cytokinin degradation while facilitating secondary wall formation and/or assisting in cell expansion. This work represents the first attempt to use a proteomic approach to investigate CWPs of microalgae. The reference protein map constructed and the specific protein markers obtained from this study provide a framework for future characterization of the expression and physiological functions of the proteins involved in the biogenesis and modifications in the cell wall of Haematococcus and related organisms.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley - V C H Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley-vch.de/home/proteomicsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProteomicsen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Cycleen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Divisionen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Wall - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshChlorophyta - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshChromatography, High Pressure Liquiden_US
dc.subject.meshDatabases As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gelen_US
dc.subject.meshFlagella - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshFlow Cytometryen_US
dc.subject.meshGlucosyltransferases - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshHeat-Shock Proteins - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrolysisen_US
dc.subject.meshMass Spectrometryen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopyen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electronen_US
dc.subject.meshOxidation-Reductionen_US
dc.subject.meshOxidoreductases - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPeptides - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshProtein Bindingen_US
dc.subject.meshProteomics - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshSpectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionizationen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshXanthophyllsen_US
dc.subject.meshBeta Carotene - Analogs & Derivatives - Chemistryen_US
dc.titleCell wall proteomics of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chloroplyceae)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, F: sfchen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, F=rp00672en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pmic.200300634en_US
dc.identifier.pmid14997492-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1542406265en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros90888-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1542406265&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage692en_US
dc.identifier.epage708en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220179100014-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, SB=7410347419en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, Q=26666082400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSommerfeld, M=7007025132en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, F=7404907980en_US

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