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Article: Could the indirect competition hypothesis explain inter-sexual site segregation in red deer (Cervus elaphus L.)?

TitleCould the indirect competition hypothesis explain inter-sexual site segregation in red deer (Cervus elaphus L.)?
Authors
KeywordsBody Size Hypothesis
Cervus Elaphus
Habitat Use
Indirect Competition
Jarman-Bell Principle
Sexual Segregation
Spatial Segregation
Issue Date2001
Citation
Journal Of Zoology, 2001, v. 254 n. 2, p. 185-193 How to Cite?
AbstractInter-sexual segregation between habitats or between sites within a habitat is very widespread in sexually dimorphic ungulates. As an explanation, it has been suggested that males, because of their larger forage requirements, are driven from preferred, high quality forage habitats into marginal habitats of lower forage quality but higher forage biomass by female competition ('indirect competition hypothesis'). However, this hypothesis has hardly been tested. In the present study, we tested the indirect competition hypothesis for site segregation of red deer on the Isle of Rum, Scotland, within two vegetation communities: short Agrostis/Festuca grassland and Calluna heath. We predicted that: (1) males should choose sites within each vegetation community that are of higher forage biomass but lower forage quality, than sites selected by females; (2) the degree of inter-sexual site segregation should be highest within the vegetation community in which indirect competition was most intense. We found that the sexes were significantly segregated between sites within both vegetation communities, but males did not use sites of lower forage quality or of higher forage biomass than did females. Moreover, degree of site segregation was not significantly higher in the vegetation community in which competition was more intense (i.e. short Agrostis/Festuca grassland). We conclude that the indirect competition hypothesis cannot explain site segregation in red deer on the Isle of Rum.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178737
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.819
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.032
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorConradt, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorGordon, IJen_US
dc.contributor.authorCluttonBrock, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorGuinness, FEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:49:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:49:24Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Zoology, 2001, v. 254 n. 2, p. 185-193en_US
dc.identifier.issn0952-8369en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178737-
dc.description.abstractInter-sexual segregation between habitats or between sites within a habitat is very widespread in sexually dimorphic ungulates. As an explanation, it has been suggested that males, because of their larger forage requirements, are driven from preferred, high quality forage habitats into marginal habitats of lower forage quality but higher forage biomass by female competition ('indirect competition hypothesis'). However, this hypothesis has hardly been tested. In the present study, we tested the indirect competition hypothesis for site segregation of red deer on the Isle of Rum, Scotland, within two vegetation communities: short Agrostis/Festuca grassland and Calluna heath. We predicted that: (1) males should choose sites within each vegetation community that are of higher forage biomass but lower forage quality, than sites selected by females; (2) the degree of inter-sexual site segregation should be highest within the vegetation community in which indirect competition was most intense. We found that the sexes were significantly segregated between sites within both vegetation communities, but males did not use sites of lower forage quality or of higher forage biomass than did females. Moreover, degree of site segregation was not significantly higher in the vegetation community in which competition was more intense (i.e. short Agrostis/Festuca grassland). We conclude that the indirect competition hypothesis cannot explain site segregation in red deer on the Isle of Rum.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Zoologyen_US
dc.subjectBody Size Hypothesisen_US
dc.subjectCervus Elaphusen_US
dc.subjectHabitat Useen_US
dc.subjectIndirect Competitionen_US
dc.subjectJarman-Bell Principleen_US
dc.subjectSexual Segregationen_US
dc.subjectSpatial Segregationen_US
dc.titleCould the indirect competition hypothesis explain inter-sexual site segregation in red deer (Cervus elaphus L.)?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThomson, D: dthomson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThomson, D=rp00788en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0952836901000693en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034982703en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034982703&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume254en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage185en_US
dc.identifier.epage193en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000169517300006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConradt, L=6701668951en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGordon, IJ=7201551536en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCluttonBrock, TH=7005942965en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomson, D=7202586830en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuinness, FE=35563280800en_US

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