File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The widespread declines of songbirds in rural Britain do not correlate with the spread of their avian predators

TitleThe widespread declines of songbirds in rural Britain do not correlate with the spread of their avian predators
Authors
KeywordsPopulation Declines
Predation
Rates Of Population Change
Issue Date1998
PublisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.royalsoc.ac.uk/index.cfm?page=1087
Citation
Proceedings Of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 1998, v. 265 n. 1410, p. 2057-2062 How to Cite?
AbstractDuring the last 30 years, there have been marked declines in the populations of many British songbirds breeding on farmland, while two of their main predators, sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus) and magpie (Pica pica), have spread back into areas from which they had disappeared. The causes of the songbird declines remain unclear but given the coincidence in timing, it might appear that increased predation could be responsible. Although many studies have failed to find links between changes in the populations of breeding songbirds and mortality from avian predators, previous work has, with few exceptions, involved only short-term studies on small spatial scales. Here we use large-scale, long-term data from a national bird census scheme to examine whether magpies and sparrowhawks could have depressed the rates of year-to-year population change in 23 songbird species. Our results indicate that magpies and sparrowhawks are unlikely to have caused the songbird declines because patterns of year-to-year population change did not differ between sites with and without these predators.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178642
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.823
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.375

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThomson, DLen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreen, REen_US
dc.contributor.authorGregory, RDen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaillie, SRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:48:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:48:53Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 1998, v. 265 n. 1410, p. 2057-2062en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178642-
dc.description.abstractDuring the last 30 years, there have been marked declines in the populations of many British songbirds breeding on farmland, while two of their main predators, sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus) and magpie (Pica pica), have spread back into areas from which they had disappeared. The causes of the songbird declines remain unclear but given the coincidence in timing, it might appear that increased predation could be responsible. Although many studies have failed to find links between changes in the populations of breeding songbirds and mortality from avian predators, previous work has, with few exceptions, involved only short-term studies on small spatial scales. Here we use large-scale, long-term data from a national bird census scheme to examine whether magpies and sparrowhawks could have depressed the rates of year-to-year population change in 23 songbird species. Our results indicate that magpies and sparrowhawks are unlikely to have caused the songbird declines because patterns of year-to-year population change did not differ between sites with and without these predators.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.royalsoc.ac.uk/index.cfm?page=1087en_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPopulation Declinesen_US
dc.subjectPredationen_US
dc.subjectRates Of Population Changeen_US
dc.titleThe widespread declines of songbirds in rural Britain do not correlate with the spread of their avian predatorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThomson, DL: dthomson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThomson, DL=rp00788en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.1998.0540en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032494701en_US
dc.identifier.volume265en_US
dc.identifier.issue1410en_US
dc.identifier.spage2057en_US
dc.identifier.epage2062en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomson, DL=7202586830en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGreen, RE=7403916297en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGregory, RD=7402332144en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaillie, SR=7005297384en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10703016-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats