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Article: Effects of population size, mating system, and evolutionary origin on genetic diversity in Spiranthes sinensis and S. hongkongensis | Efectos del tamano poblacional, sistema de fecundacion y origen evolutivo en la diversidad genetica de Spiranthes sinensis y S. hongkongensis

TitleEffects of population size, mating system, and evolutionary origin on genetic diversity in Spiranthes sinensis and S. hongkongensis | Efectos del tamano poblacional, sistema de fecundacion y origen evolutivo en la diversidad genetica de Spiranthes sinensis y S. hongkongensis
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CBI
Citation
Conservation Biology, 1996, v. 10 n. 3, p. 785-795 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong once supported more than 109 species of wild orchids, of which approximately 30% were endemic. Most of the local wild orchids have now become rare or endangered. I conducted a comparative study of genetic diversity in two closely related terrestrial orchids, an allotetraploid, Spiranthes hongkongensis, and its diploid progenitor, S. sinensis, to address the effects of the population bottleneck associated with the origin of the polyploid and to investigate the relationships between number of breeding individuals, mating system, and level of isozyme variation in their populations. Nearly complete genetic uniformity was observed both within and among populations of S. hongkongensis. In contrast, S. sinensis had high levels of genetic variation for all the genetic parameters examined. Regression analysis of population size and several components of genetic diversity in S. sinensis revealed that, among various measures of within- population variation, the proportion of polymorphic loci (P) and average number of alleles per locus (A) or per polymorphic locus (A(P)) were the most sensitive to population size (R2=0.942, p=0.01) between population size and the mean frequency of private alleles in pairwise population comparisons, p(I), indicated that population size may also be used to predict the extent of population differentiation caused by random genetic drift. Conservation of genetic diversity in S. sinensis could be maximized by protecting several of both large and small populations, whereas fewer populations may be needed to achieve this goal for S. hongkongensis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178584
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.267
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.609
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:48:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:48:30Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationConservation Biology, 1996, v. 10 n. 3, p. 785-795en_US
dc.identifier.issn0888-8892en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178584-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong once supported more than 109 species of wild orchids, of which approximately 30% were endemic. Most of the local wild orchids have now become rare or endangered. I conducted a comparative study of genetic diversity in two closely related terrestrial orchids, an allotetraploid, Spiranthes hongkongensis, and its diploid progenitor, S. sinensis, to address the effects of the population bottleneck associated with the origin of the polyploid and to investigate the relationships between number of breeding individuals, mating system, and level of isozyme variation in their populations. Nearly complete genetic uniformity was observed both within and among populations of S. hongkongensis. In contrast, S. sinensis had high levels of genetic variation for all the genetic parameters examined. Regression analysis of population size and several components of genetic diversity in S. sinensis revealed that, among various measures of within- population variation, the proportion of polymorphic loci (P) and average number of alleles per locus (A) or per polymorphic locus (A(P)) were the most sensitive to population size (R2=0.942, p=0.01) between population size and the mean frequency of private alleles in pairwise population comparisons, p(I), indicated that population size may also be used to predict the extent of population differentiation caused by random genetic drift. Conservation of genetic diversity in S. sinensis could be maximized by protecting several of both large and small populations, whereas fewer populations may be needed to achieve this goal for S. hongkongensis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CBIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofConservation Biologyen_US
dc.titleEffects of population size, mating system, and evolutionary origin on genetic diversity in Spiranthes sinensis and S. hongkongensis | Efectos del tamano poblacional, sistema de fecundacion y origen evolutivo en la diversidad genetica de Spiranthes sinensis y S. hongkongensisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSun, M: meisun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySun, M=rp00779en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1523-1739.1996.10030785.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029783168en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030446382-
dc.identifier.hkuros15583-
dc.identifier.hkuros21394-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0029783168&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage785en_US
dc.identifier.epage795en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996VA57200014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, M=7403181447en_US

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