File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Effect of environmental parameters on the degradability of polymer films in laboratory-scale composting reactors

TitleEffect of environmental parameters on the degradability of polymer films in laboratory-scale composting reactors
Authors
KeywordsBiodegradable Polymers
Biodegradation Testing
Cellulose Acetate
Compost Simulation
Moisture Content
Municipal Solid Waste
Plastic Film Weight Loss
Polymer Biodegradation
Polymer Degradation
Synthetic Compost Mixes
Issue Date1994
Citation
Journal Of Environmental Polymer Degradation, 1994, v. 2 n. 2, p. 129-135 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious research in our laboratory reported a convenient laboratory-scale composting test method to study the weight loss of polymer films in aerobic thermophilic (53°C) reactors maintained at a 60% moisture content. The laboratory-scale compost reactors contained the following synthetic compost mixture (percentage on dry-weight basis): tree leaves (45.0), shredded paper (16.5), food (6.7), meat (5.8), cow manure (17.5), sawdust (1.9), aluminum and steel shavings (2.4), glass beads (1.3), urea (1.9), and a compost seed (1.0) which is designated Mix-1 in this work. To simplify the laboratory-scale compost weight loss test method and better understand how compost mixture compositions and environmental parameters affect the rate of plastic degradation, a systematic variation of the synthetic mixture composition as well as the moisture content was carried out. Cellulose acetate (CA) with a degree of substitution (DS) value of 1.7 and cellophane films were chosen as test polymer substrates for this work. The extent of CA DS-1.7 and cellophane weight loss as a function of the exposure time remained unchanged when the metal and glass components of the mixture were excluded in Mix-2. Further study showed that large variations in the mixture composition such as the replacement of tree leaves, food, meat, and sawdust with steam-exploded wood and alfalfa (forming Mix-C) could be made with little or no change in the time dependence of CA DS-1.7 film weight loss. In contrast, substituting tree leaves, food, meat, cow manure, and sawdust with steam-exploded wood in combination with either Rabbit Choice (Mix-D) or starch and urea (Mix-E) resulted in a significant time increase (from 7 to 12 days) for the complete disappearance of CA DS-1.7 films. Interestingly, in this work no direct correlation was observed between the C/N ratio (which ranged from 13.9 to 61.4) and the CA DS-1.7 film weight loss. Decreasing moisture contents of the compost Mix-2 from 60 and 50 and 40% resulted in dramatic changes in polymer degradation such that CA DS-1.7 showed an increase in the time period for a complete disappearance of polymer films from 6 to 16 and 30 days, respectively. © 1994 Plenum Publishing Corporation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178569
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWelton, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorEberiel, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorMccarthy, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorGross, RAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:48:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:48:27Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Environmental Polymer Degradation, 1994, v. 2 n. 2, p. 129-135en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-7564en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178569-
dc.description.abstractPrevious research in our laboratory reported a convenient laboratory-scale composting test method to study the weight loss of polymer films in aerobic thermophilic (53°C) reactors maintained at a 60% moisture content. The laboratory-scale compost reactors contained the following synthetic compost mixture (percentage on dry-weight basis): tree leaves (45.0), shredded paper (16.5), food (6.7), meat (5.8), cow manure (17.5), sawdust (1.9), aluminum and steel shavings (2.4), glass beads (1.3), urea (1.9), and a compost seed (1.0) which is designated Mix-1 in this work. To simplify the laboratory-scale compost weight loss test method and better understand how compost mixture compositions and environmental parameters affect the rate of plastic degradation, a systematic variation of the synthetic mixture composition as well as the moisture content was carried out. Cellulose acetate (CA) with a degree of substitution (DS) value of 1.7 and cellophane films were chosen as test polymer substrates for this work. The extent of CA DS-1.7 and cellophane weight loss as a function of the exposure time remained unchanged when the metal and glass components of the mixture were excluded in Mix-2. Further study showed that large variations in the mixture composition such as the replacement of tree leaves, food, meat, and sawdust with steam-exploded wood and alfalfa (forming Mix-C) could be made with little or no change in the time dependence of CA DS-1.7 film weight loss. In contrast, substituting tree leaves, food, meat, cow manure, and sawdust with steam-exploded wood in combination with either Rabbit Choice (Mix-D) or starch and urea (Mix-E) resulted in a significant time increase (from 7 to 12 days) for the complete disappearance of CA DS-1.7 films. Interestingly, in this work no direct correlation was observed between the C/N ratio (which ranged from 13.9 to 61.4) and the CA DS-1.7 film weight loss. Decreasing moisture contents of the compost Mix-2 from 60 and 50 and 40% resulted in dramatic changes in polymer degradation such that CA DS-1.7 showed an increase in the time period for a complete disappearance of polymer films from 6 to 16 and 30 days, respectively. © 1994 Plenum Publishing Corporation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Environmental Polymer Degradationen_US
dc.subjectBiodegradable Polymersen_US
dc.subjectBiodegradation Testingen_US
dc.subjectCellulose Acetateen_US
dc.subjectCompost Simulationen_US
dc.subjectMoisture Contenten_US
dc.subjectMunicipal Solid Wasteen_US
dc.subjectPlastic Film Weight Lossen_US
dc.subjectPolymer Biodegradationen_US
dc.subjectPolymer Degradationen_US
dc.subjectSynthetic Compost Mixesen_US
dc.titleEffect of environmental parameters on the degradability of polymer films in laboratory-scale composting reactorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF02074781en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028404726en_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage129en_US
dc.identifier.epage135en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, S=7408522824en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWelton, R=7004904411en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEberiel, D=6602234796en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcCarthy, SP=35431476300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGross, RA=7403099956en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats