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Article: Endangered ecosystems: a review of the conservation status of tropical Asian rivers

TitleEndangered ecosystems: a review of the conservation status of tropical Asian rivers
Authors
Issue Date1992
Citation
Hydrobiologia, 1992, v. 248 n. 3, p. 167-191 How to Cite?
AbstractAmong the diverse human influences upon tropical Asian rivers, three threats stand out: 1) Degradation of drainage basins (particularly through deforestation and overgrazing) leads to increased suspended sediment loads and extensive flooding. Excessive floodplain siltation alters habitats causing species decline or disappearance. 2) River regulation and control has been practised widely in the region for centuries but, with the planned development of massive projects on the Yangtze and Mekong Rivers, the potential for environmental damage has increased. Fish breeding migrations may be disrupted, because dams block migration routes or changed flow regimes fail to stimulate reproduction. 3) River pollution is pervasive throughout the region. Untreated sewage is a particular problem in densely-populated areas, and pollution by industrial effluents and mining wastes is becoming more important. These threats have led to declines and range constrictions of aquatic animals and those terrestrial species associated with riparian corridors and floodplains. River dolphins and certain crocodilians are particularly threatened, but declines in species of waterfowl, floodplain deer, a host of fishes, macrophytes, and invertebrates have been documented. Reserving the trend is difficult as pollution, flow regulation, and drainage-basin degradation have non-additive detrimental effects on river ecosystems, and enhance the success of exotic invasive species. Ecologically viable management strategies for tropical Asian rivers will succeed only if the socioeconomic context of development plans is taken into account. -from Author
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178538

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:48:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:48:16Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationHydrobiologia, 1992, v. 248 n. 3, p. 167-191en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178538-
dc.description.abstractAmong the diverse human influences upon tropical Asian rivers, three threats stand out: 1) Degradation of drainage basins (particularly through deforestation and overgrazing) leads to increased suspended sediment loads and extensive flooding. Excessive floodplain siltation alters habitats causing species decline or disappearance. 2) River regulation and control has been practised widely in the region for centuries but, with the planned development of massive projects on the Yangtze and Mekong Rivers, the potential for environmental damage has increased. Fish breeding migrations may be disrupted, because dams block migration routes or changed flow regimes fail to stimulate reproduction. 3) River pollution is pervasive throughout the region. Untreated sewage is a particular problem in densely-populated areas, and pollution by industrial effluents and mining wastes is becoming more important. These threats have led to declines and range constrictions of aquatic animals and those terrestrial species associated with riparian corridors and floodplains. River dolphins and certain crocodilians are particularly threatened, but declines in species of waterfowl, floodplain deer, a host of fishes, macrophytes, and invertebrates have been documented. Reserving the trend is difficult as pollution, flow regulation, and drainage-basin degradation have non-additive detrimental effects on river ecosystems, and enhance the success of exotic invasive species. Ecologically viable management strategies for tropical Asian rivers will succeed only if the socioeconomic context of development plans is taken into account. -from Authoren_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHydrobiologiaen_US
dc.titleEndangered ecosystems: a review of the conservation status of tropical Asian riversen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027020047en_US
dc.identifier.volume248en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage167en_US
dc.identifier.epage191en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_US

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