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Article: Nutrition, immune function, and inflammation: an overview.

TitleNutrition, immune function, and inflammation: an overview.
Authors
Issue Date1989
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PNS
Citation
Proceedings Of The Nutrition Society, 1989, v. 48 n. 3, p. 315-335 How to Cite?
AbstractThe collective evidence suggests that nutritional insult to both cell-mediated and humoral immunity in the presence of protein-energy malnutrition contributes to abnormalities of inflammation. The primary goal of nutritional support in inflammatory disease is to provide adequate energy and protein to meet endogenous requirements for tissue repair, IL-1 production, and restored cellular function, thus preventing secondary infection. Substrate provision should aim at improving the acute phase of injury while avoiding immune dysfunction. This goal may be achieved by altering the eicosanoid pathway toward a more regulated inflammatory state. In the context of allograft response, macrophages are central to the initiation of allosensitization by virtue of their ability to present antigen to T-cells. Activated T-cells may further modulate macrophage function by the secretion of lymphokines. Manipulation of macrophage eicosanoid production by dietary omega-3 PUFA may reduce cellular immune response. (table; see text) Nutritional support should also focus on providing essential micronutrients, with their potentially immunomodulating role, as adjunctive therapy in order to protect the host from toxic effects of free-radicals and chemicals released during inflammatory events. (Feeding regimens currently under investigation and development are presented in Table 4.) By integrating dietary immunotherapy with the use of recombinant hormones, monoclonal antibodies, and various available monokines, an optimal outcome for each patient may be achieved. However, effective application of immunotherapy to nutritional supplementation will require accurate monitoring of immune function in individual patients in order to avoid inappropriate treatment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178473
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.703
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.820
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWan, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaw, MPen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlackburn, GLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:47:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:47:54Z-
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The Nutrition Society, 1989, v. 48 n. 3, p. 315-335en_US
dc.identifier.issn0029-6651en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178473-
dc.description.abstractThe collective evidence suggests that nutritional insult to both cell-mediated and humoral immunity in the presence of protein-energy malnutrition contributes to abnormalities of inflammation. The primary goal of nutritional support in inflammatory disease is to provide adequate energy and protein to meet endogenous requirements for tissue repair, IL-1 production, and restored cellular function, thus preventing secondary infection. Substrate provision should aim at improving the acute phase of injury while avoiding immune dysfunction. This goal may be achieved by altering the eicosanoid pathway toward a more regulated inflammatory state. In the context of allograft response, macrophages are central to the initiation of allosensitization by virtue of their ability to present antigen to T-cells. Activated T-cells may further modulate macrophage function by the secretion of lymphokines. Manipulation of macrophage eicosanoid production by dietary omega-3 PUFA may reduce cellular immune response. (table; see text) Nutritional support should also focus on providing essential micronutrients, with their potentially immunomodulating role, as adjunctive therapy in order to protect the host from toxic effects of free-radicals and chemicals released during inflammatory events. (Feeding regimens currently under investigation and development are presented in Table 4.) By integrating dietary immunotherapy with the use of recombinant hormones, monoclonal antibodies, and various available monokines, an optimal outcome for each patient may be achieved. However, effective application of immunotherapy to nutritional supplementation will require accurate monitoring of immune function in individual patients in order to avoid inappropriate treatment.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PNSen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Nutrition Societyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmune Toleranceen_US
dc.subject.meshInflammation - Complications - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNutritional Physiological Phenomenaen_US
dc.subject.meshProtein-Energy Malnutrition - Complications - Immunologyen_US
dc.titleNutrition, immune function, and inflammation: an overview.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWan, JM: jmfwan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWan, JM=rp00798en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1079/PNS19890048-
dc.identifier.pmid2515541-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0024723107en_US
dc.identifier.volume48en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage315en_US
dc.identifier.epage335en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1989CH55900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, JM=8930305000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHaw, MP=36788359500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBlackburn, GL=7201722807en_US

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