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Article: Respiratory responses and tolerance to hypoxia in two marine teleosts, Epinephelus akaara (Temminck & Schlegel) and Mylio macrocephalus (Basilewsky)

TitleRespiratory responses and tolerance to hypoxia in two marine teleosts, Epinephelus akaara (Temminck & Schlegel) and Mylio macrocephalus (Basilewsky)
Authors
KeywordsHypoxia
Marine Teleost
Respiratory Responses
Tolerance
Issue Date1984
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-8158
Citation
Hydrobiologia, 1984, v. 119 n. 3, p. 209-217 How to Cite?
AbstractThe respiratory responses and tolerance of hypoxia were studied in two marine teleosts, the red grouper (Epinephelus akaara, a sluggish species) and the black sea bream (Mylio macrocephalus, an active species). Neither species showed abnormal behaviour or mortality when exposed to 2 mg O2 l-1 for 7 h. The black sea bream was, however, comparatively more tolerant when exposed to 1 mg O2 l-1, but tolerance of both species became similar under extremely hypoxic conditions (i.e. 0.5 mg O2 l-1). In contrast to most other teleosts, both species showed a reduction in opercular beating rate during hypoxia, and oxygen conformity was found in the range of 0.5 to 7.0 mg O2l -1. O2 dissociation curves were constructed, and the P50 value of the black sea breams (27 ± 5.6 mm Hg) was found to be much lower than that of the red groupers (50 ± 2.5 mm Hg). For both species, the general levels of venous PO2 showed a direct relationship to ambient PO2, and were markedly reduced after 1 h exposure to various levels of hypoxia. Compared with the red groupers, the black sea breams appeared to be more able to maintain its venous PO2 levels during prolonged hypoxic exposure. © 1984 Dr W. Junk Publishers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178381
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.051
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.043
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, NYSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:47:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:47:22Z-
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.identifier.citationHydrobiologia, 1984, v. 119 n. 3, p. 209-217en_US
dc.identifier.issn0018-8158en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178381-
dc.description.abstractThe respiratory responses and tolerance of hypoxia were studied in two marine teleosts, the red grouper (Epinephelus akaara, a sluggish species) and the black sea bream (Mylio macrocephalus, an active species). Neither species showed abnormal behaviour or mortality when exposed to 2 mg O2 l-1 for 7 h. The black sea bream was, however, comparatively more tolerant when exposed to 1 mg O2 l-1, but tolerance of both species became similar under extremely hypoxic conditions (i.e. 0.5 mg O2 l-1). In contrast to most other teleosts, both species showed a reduction in opercular beating rate during hypoxia, and oxygen conformity was found in the range of 0.5 to 7.0 mg O2l -1. O2 dissociation curves were constructed, and the P50 value of the black sea breams (27 ± 5.6 mm Hg) was found to be much lower than that of the red groupers (50 ± 2.5 mm Hg). For both species, the general levels of venous PO2 showed a direct relationship to ambient PO2, and were markedly reduced after 1 h exposure to various levels of hypoxia. Compared with the red groupers, the black sea breams appeared to be more able to maintain its venous PO2 levels during prolonged hypoxic exposure. © 1984 Dr W. Junk Publishers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-8158en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHydrobiologiaen_US
dc.subjectHypoxiaen_US
dc.subjectMarine Teleosten_US
dc.subjectRespiratory Responsesen_US
dc.subjectToleranceen_US
dc.titleRespiratory responses and tolerance to hypoxia in two marine teleosts, Epinephelus akaara (Temminck & Schlegel) and Mylio macrocephalus (Basilewsky)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF00015211en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0001534085en_US
dc.identifier.volume119en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage209en_US
dc.identifier.epage217en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1984AAT2200005-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, NYS=7005683595en_US

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