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Article: Scraping a living: a review of littorinid grazing

TitleScraping a living: a review of littorinid grazing
Authors
KeywordsAlgal Defences
Feeding Behaviour
Intertidal Ecology
Issue Date1990
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-8158
Citation
Hydrobiologia, 1990, v. 193 n. 1, p. 117-138 How to Cite?
AbstractLittorinid snails are predominantly herbivorous and the versatility of their radulae enables them to feed on a variety of macroscopic and microscopic plants in a diversity of habitats. Some are selective feeders preferring some species of algae to others, and rejecting some even after a prolonged period of starvation. Different species of snail exhibit different preferences. The factors affecting the attractiveness and edibility of food plants are discussed and food value considered. Foraging behaviour of littorinids is briefly reviewed in relation to the influence of chemical cues from the algae. Littorinids appear to be able to select or reject algae without having ingested them, having perceived the plants from a distance, moving towards favoured foods (or habitat-providing plants) and away from those that it rejects. The nature of the chemical cues emitted by the algae is discussed. Temporal patterns of foraging activity show some evidence of an endogenous component which can be overridden by responses to environmental conditions. These patterns place restraints on energy intake. The structural and chemical defences used by algae against littorinid grazing are considered. The importance of polyphenolic compounds is evaluated. The effects of grazing as a selective agency and a factor influencing algal populations are discussed. There is some evidence that life history patterns are a response to grazing. The influence of external physical factors, such as salinity on grazing pressure is demonstrated. Finally, the impact of littorinid snails on intertidal communities is assessed in relation to their abundance and biogeographical distribution. The relative importance of littorinids is contrasted on shores possessing or lacking limpets. © 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178379
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.051
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.043
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNorton, TAen_US
dc.contributor.authorHawkins, SJen_US
dc.contributor.authorManley, NLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, DCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:47:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:47:21Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationHydrobiologia, 1990, v. 193 n. 1, p. 117-138en_US
dc.identifier.issn0018-8158en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178379-
dc.description.abstractLittorinid snails are predominantly herbivorous and the versatility of their radulae enables them to feed on a variety of macroscopic and microscopic plants in a diversity of habitats. Some are selective feeders preferring some species of algae to others, and rejecting some even after a prolonged period of starvation. Different species of snail exhibit different preferences. The factors affecting the attractiveness and edibility of food plants are discussed and food value considered. Foraging behaviour of littorinids is briefly reviewed in relation to the influence of chemical cues from the algae. Littorinids appear to be able to select or reject algae without having ingested them, having perceived the plants from a distance, moving towards favoured foods (or habitat-providing plants) and away from those that it rejects. The nature of the chemical cues emitted by the algae is discussed. Temporal patterns of foraging activity show some evidence of an endogenous component which can be overridden by responses to environmental conditions. These patterns place restraints on energy intake. The structural and chemical defences used by algae against littorinid grazing are considered. The importance of polyphenolic compounds is evaluated. The effects of grazing as a selective agency and a factor influencing algal populations are discussed. There is some evidence that life history patterns are a response to grazing. The influence of external physical factors, such as salinity on grazing pressure is demonstrated. Finally, the impact of littorinid snails on intertidal communities is assessed in relation to their abundance and biogeographical distribution. The relative importance of littorinids is contrasted on shores possessing or lacking limpets. © 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-8158en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHydrobiologiaen_US
dc.subjectAlgal Defencesen_US
dc.subjectFeeding Behaviouren_US
dc.subjectIntertidal Ecologyen_US
dc.titleScraping a living: a review of littorinid grazingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF00028071en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0001449884en_US
dc.identifier.volume193en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage117en_US
dc.identifier.epage138en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990DA93300011-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNorton, TA=7102567001en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHawkins, SJ=7203056838en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridManley, NL=16436154100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWatson, DC=7402906365en_US

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