File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Conservation of freshwater biodiversity in Oriental Asia: Constraints, conflicts, and challenges to science and sustainability

TitleConservation of freshwater biodiversity in Oriental Asia: Constraints, conflicts, and challenges to science and sustainability
Authors
KeywordsFishes
Lakes
Pollution
Rivers
Wetlands
Issue Date2000
PublisherSpringer Japan. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/10201/index.htm
Citation
Limnology, 2000, v. 1 n. 3, p. 237-243 How to Cite?
AbstractFreshwater ecosystems in Asia are under grave threat. Large and growing human populations and the rapid pace of development have led to the degradation of natural environments throughout the region. Conservation of freshwater biodiversity faces particular challenges because of a lack of public awareness of its magnitude and importance, Even taxa with high public-relations value, such as fishes, are rather poorly known, and the variety of other animals associated with lakes and riverine wetlands, including charismatic and endangered megafauna, seems to have escaped wide attention. The rate and extent of environmental change in Asia are having impacts on the aquatic biota that may be greater than anywhere else on the planet. Particular threats include water pollution, from point and nonpoint sources, which is almost ubiquitous; overharvest of fishes, turtles, and crocodilians; flow regulation and impoundment of rivers; as well as drainage basin degradation and climate change. Many lakes have been so modified by human activities that they function as enormous fishponds, and the introduction of exotic species (especially, but not only, fishes) or the translocation of native taxa has contributed to the extinction of endemic species in isolated drainage basins. The prognosis is grim, and we can anticipate a loss in biodiversity and homogenization of the regional biota. Reversal of these trends will require a change in focus by limnologists and water-resource managers, and the urgent adoption of a conservation agenda for freshwater science in Asia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178366
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.745
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.327
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:47:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:47:17Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationLimnology, 2000, v. 1 n. 3, p. 237-243en_US
dc.identifier.issn1439-8621en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178366-
dc.description.abstractFreshwater ecosystems in Asia are under grave threat. Large and growing human populations and the rapid pace of development have led to the degradation of natural environments throughout the region. Conservation of freshwater biodiversity faces particular challenges because of a lack of public awareness of its magnitude and importance, Even taxa with high public-relations value, such as fishes, are rather poorly known, and the variety of other animals associated with lakes and riverine wetlands, including charismatic and endangered megafauna, seems to have escaped wide attention. The rate and extent of environmental change in Asia are having impacts on the aquatic biota that may be greater than anywhere else on the planet. Particular threats include water pollution, from point and nonpoint sources, which is almost ubiquitous; overharvest of fishes, turtles, and crocodilians; flow regulation and impoundment of rivers; as well as drainage basin degradation and climate change. Many lakes have been so modified by human activities that they function as enormous fishponds, and the introduction of exotic species (especially, but not only, fishes) or the translocation of native taxa has contributed to the extinction of endemic species in isolated drainage basins. The prognosis is grim, and we can anticipate a loss in biodiversity and homogenization of the regional biota. Reversal of these trends will require a change in focus by limnologists and water-resource managers, and the urgent adoption of a conservation agenda for freshwater science in Asia.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Japan. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/10201/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLimnologyen_US
dc.subjectFishesen_US
dc.subjectLakesen_US
dc.subjectPollutionen_US
dc.subjectRiversen_US
dc.subjectWetlandsen_US
dc.titleConservation of freshwater biodiversity in Oriental Asia: Constraints, conflicts, and challenges to science and sustainabilityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0000748802en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros55952-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0000748802&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume1en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage237en_US
dc.identifier.epage243en_US
dc.publisher.placeJapanen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats