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Article: Secrets to success: A qualitative study of perceptions of childhood immunisations in a highly immunised population

TitleSecrets to success: A qualitative study of perceptions of childhood immunisations in a highly immunised population
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JPC
Citation
Journal Of Paediatrics And Child Health, 2008, v. 44 n. 10, p. 541-547 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: The aim of this study was to explore childhood immunisations with a sample of parents from a population where children have high vaccination coverage and to identify factors which might encourage uptake in other populations. Methods: This research was conducted as part of a larger study on childhood immunisations in Hong Kong. In-depth interviews were conducted with a subsample of parents (n = 15) to further explore general perceptions and health beliefs about childhood immunisations. Interview data were analysed using content analysis techniques. Results: Three core themes emerged from the data: individual influences factors, family and social factors, and system factors. [Correction added after online publication 21/8/08: sentence corrected from "Four core themes emerged from the data: individual influences, family influences and system influences."] Parents readily admitted knowledge deficits concerning childhood vaccines but believed that the benefits of immunisation outweighed the risks. Family members and peers were a source of pro-immunisation advice and comprehensive public health programmes and mandatory vaccination requirements for school entry ensured that childhood immunisation recommendations were followed. Conclusions: Overall, Hong Kong parents are highly supportive of immunisation programmes and insight gained from this study could prove helpful to providers trying to improve uptake rates among other populations. © 2008 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178297
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.477
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.692
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:45:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:45:07Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Paediatrics And Child Health, 2008, v. 44 n. 10, p. 541-547en_US
dc.identifier.issn1034-4810en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178297-
dc.description.abstractAim: The aim of this study was to explore childhood immunisations with a sample of parents from a population where children have high vaccination coverage and to identify factors which might encourage uptake in other populations. Methods: This research was conducted as part of a larger study on childhood immunisations in Hong Kong. In-depth interviews were conducted with a subsample of parents (n = 15) to further explore general perceptions and health beliefs about childhood immunisations. Interview data were analysed using content analysis techniques. Results: Three core themes emerged from the data: individual influences factors, family and social factors, and system factors. [Correction added after online publication 21/8/08: sentence corrected from "Four core themes emerged from the data: individual influences, family influences and system influences."] Parents readily admitted knowledge deficits concerning childhood vaccines but believed that the benefits of immunisation outweighed the risks. Family members and peers were a source of pro-immunisation advice and comprehensive public health programmes and mandatory vaccination requirements for school entry ensured that childhood immunisation recommendations were followed. Conclusions: Overall, Hong Kong parents are highly supportive of immunisation programmes and insight gained from this study could prove helpful to providers trying to improve uptake rates among other populations. © 2008 The Authors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JPCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Paediatrics and Child Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunization - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshInterviews As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMothers - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshParentsen_US
dc.subject.meshQualitative Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshVaccination - Utilizationen_US
dc.titleSecrets to success: A qualitative study of perceptions of childhood immunisations in a highly immunised populationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTarrant, M: tarrantm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTarrant, M=rp00461en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1754.2008.01334.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid18564075-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-52649093292en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros143513-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-52649093292&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume44en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage541en_US
dc.identifier.epage547en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000259525600004-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTarrant, M=7004340118en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomson, N=36901018000en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike3356556-

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