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Article: A randomised controlled trial of Tai Chi and resistance exercise on bone health, muscle strength and balance in community-living elderly people

TitleA randomised controlled trial of Tai Chi and resistance exercise on bone health, muscle strength and balance in community-living elderly people
Authors
KeywordsBalance
Bone Mineral Density
Elderly
Muscle Strength
Resistance Exercise
Tai Chi
Issue Date2007
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Age And Ageing, 2007, v. 36 n. 3, p. 262-268 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The beneficial role of exercise in improving bone mineral density, muscle strength and balance, has been documented predominantly in younger populations. These findings may not apply to elderly populations with limited ability to perform exercises of high intensity. Objective: To examine the effects of Tai Chi (TC) and resistance exercise (RTE) on bone mineral density (BMD), muscle strength, balance and flexibility in community living elderly people. Design: Randomised controlle trial, usng blocked randomization with stratification by sex. Setting: A community in the New Territories Region of Hong Kong, China. Subjects: One hundred eighty subjects (90 men, 90 women) aged 65-74, were recruited through advertisements in community centres. Methods: Subjects were assigned to participate in TC, RTE three times a week, or no intervention (C) for 12 months. Measurements were carried out at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) adjusted for age, and baseline values of variables that were significantly different between groups: i.e. smoking and flexibility for men; quadriceps strength for women. Results: Compliance was high (TC 81%, RTE 76%). In women, both TC and RTE groups had less BMD loss at total hip compared with controls. No effect was observed in men. No difference in either balance, flexibility or the number of falls was observed between either intervention or controls after 12 months. Conclusion: The beneficial effects of TC or RTE on musculoskeletal health are modest and may not translate into better clinical outcomes. Copyright © The Author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178290
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.201
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.611
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorHong, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorLynn, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:45:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:45:04Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationAge And Ageing, 2007, v. 36 n. 3, p. 262-268en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-0729en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178290-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The beneficial role of exercise in improving bone mineral density, muscle strength and balance, has been documented predominantly in younger populations. These findings may not apply to elderly populations with limited ability to perform exercises of high intensity. Objective: To examine the effects of Tai Chi (TC) and resistance exercise (RTE) on bone mineral density (BMD), muscle strength, balance and flexibility in community living elderly people. Design: Randomised controlle trial, usng blocked randomization with stratification by sex. Setting: A community in the New Territories Region of Hong Kong, China. Subjects: One hundred eighty subjects (90 men, 90 women) aged 65-74, were recruited through advertisements in community centres. Methods: Subjects were assigned to participate in TC, RTE three times a week, or no intervention (C) for 12 months. Measurements were carried out at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) adjusted for age, and baseline values of variables that were significantly different between groups: i.e. smoking and flexibility for men; quadriceps strength for women. Results: Compliance was high (TC 81%, RTE 76%). In women, both TC and RTE groups had less BMD loss at total hip compared with controls. No effect was observed in men. No difference in either balance, flexibility or the number of falls was observed between either intervention or controls after 12 months. Conclusion: The beneficial effects of TC or RTE on musculoskeletal health are modest and may not translate into better clinical outcomes. Copyright © The Author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAge and Ageingen_US
dc.subjectBalanceen_US
dc.subjectBone Mineral Densityen_US
dc.subjectElderlyen_US
dc.subjectMuscle Strengthen_US
dc.subjectResistance Exerciseen_US
dc.subjectTai Chien_US
dc.titleA randomised controlled trial of Tai Chi and resistance exercise on bone health, muscle strength and balance in community-living elderly peopleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHong, A: athenawl@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHong, A=rp00255en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ageing/afm005en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17356003-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34250634460en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34250634460&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage262en_US
dc.identifier.epage268en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000246119200006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, J=16949717700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHong, A=8687147500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, E=7103086055en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLynn, H=14321923700en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1275560-

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