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Article: Oceanic lithosphere 1. The origin and evolution of oceanic lithosphere: Introduction

TitleOceanic lithosphere 1. The origin and evolution of oceanic lithosphere: Introduction
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherGeological Association of Canada. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.gac.ca/JOURNALS/geocan.html
Citation
Geoscience Canada, 1997, v. 24 n. 2, p. 100-107 How to Cite?
AbstractDuring the past 25 years much has been learned about the structure and composition of oceanic lithosphere through bathymetric surveying, seismic experiments, and scientific drilling. Our understanding of the processes by which oceanic lithosphere is generated is still limited, however, by our inability to sample directly the lower crust and upper mantle. This is due to the limitations of available drilling platforms, the technological challenges of drilling on bare rock close to midocean ridges, and the inordinate expense of drilling deep holes through the ocean crust. Exposed ophiolites offer a valuable alternative source of information on oceanic lithosphere but their interpretation is hampered by uncertain provenance, tectonic dismemberment, and overprinting of original features during emplacement. Using data from studies of in situ oceanic lithosphere and ophiolites, numerous models have been developed for the genesis of oceanic crust and upper mantle which involve the interaction of a variety of magmatic, tectonic and hydrothermal processes. These models can only be tested thoroughly by deeper ocean drilling.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178213
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.225
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.577
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMalpas, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:43:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:43:28Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationGeoscience Canada, 1997, v. 24 n. 2, p. 100-107en_US
dc.identifier.issn0315-0941en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178213-
dc.description.abstractDuring the past 25 years much has been learned about the structure and composition of oceanic lithosphere through bathymetric surveying, seismic experiments, and scientific drilling. Our understanding of the processes by which oceanic lithosphere is generated is still limited, however, by our inability to sample directly the lower crust and upper mantle. This is due to the limitations of available drilling platforms, the technological challenges of drilling on bare rock close to midocean ridges, and the inordinate expense of drilling deep holes through the ocean crust. Exposed ophiolites offer a valuable alternative source of information on oceanic lithosphere but their interpretation is hampered by uncertain provenance, tectonic dismemberment, and overprinting of original features during emplacement. Using data from studies of in situ oceanic lithosphere and ophiolites, numerous models have been developed for the genesis of oceanic crust and upper mantle which involve the interaction of a variety of magmatic, tectonic and hydrothermal processes. These models can only be tested thoroughly by deeper ocean drilling.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherGeological Association of Canada. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.gac.ca/JOURNALS/geocan.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGeoscience Canadaen_US
dc.titleOceanic lithosphere 1. The origin and evolution of oceanic lithosphere: Introductionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMalpas, J: jgmalpas@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMalpas, J=rp00059en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031420042en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031420042&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage100en_US
dc.identifier.epage107en_US
dc.publisher.placeCanadaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMalpas, J=7006136845en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRobinson, P=7403720506en_US

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