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Article: Toward a further understanding of the relationships between perceptions of support and work attitudes: A meta-analysis

TitleToward a further understanding of the relationships between perceptions of support and work attitudes: A meta-analysis
Authors
KeywordsCoworker Support
Job Attitudes
Meta-Analysis
Social Support
Supervisor Support
Issue Date2008
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=80
Citation
Group And Organization Management, 2008, v. 33 n. 3, p. 243-268 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study (a) compared the effect of perceived supervisor support (PSS) and perceived coworker support (PCS) on work attitudes; (b) examined the moderating role of gender, tenure, and job type in the support-attitude relationship; and (c) tested a theoretical model hypothesizing relationships among PCS, PSS, perceived organizational support, and work attitudes. In a meta-analysis, PSS was found to be more strongly related to job satisfaction (.52 vs..37), affective commitment (.48 vs..28), and turnover intention (-.36 vs. -.19) than was PCS. Further, job type (customer-contact vs. non-customer-contact jobs) was found to be a significant moderator. Finally, the proposed model received empirical support. Different forms of support were closely related to work attitudes and to each other. Implications for research on social support are discussed. © 2008 Sage Publications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178005
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.904
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.748
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, TWHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSorensen, KLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:41:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:41:14Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationGroup And Organization Management, 2008, v. 33 n. 3, p. 243-268en_US
dc.identifier.issn1059-6011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178005-
dc.description.abstractThis study (a) compared the effect of perceived supervisor support (PSS) and perceived coworker support (PCS) on work attitudes; (b) examined the moderating role of gender, tenure, and job type in the support-attitude relationship; and (c) tested a theoretical model hypothesizing relationships among PCS, PSS, perceived organizational support, and work attitudes. In a meta-analysis, PSS was found to be more strongly related to job satisfaction (.52 vs..37), affective commitment (.48 vs..28), and turnover intention (-.36 vs. -.19) than was PCS. Further, job type (customer-contact vs. non-customer-contact jobs) was found to be a significant moderator. Finally, the proposed model received empirical support. Different forms of support were closely related to work attitudes and to each other. Implications for research on social support are discussed. © 2008 Sage Publications.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=80en_US
dc.relation.ispartofGroup and Organization Managementen_US
dc.subjectCoworker Supporten_US
dc.subjectJob Attitudesen_US
dc.subjectMeta-Analysisen_US
dc.subjectSocial Supporten_US
dc.subjectSupervisor Supporten_US
dc.titleToward a further understanding of the relationships between perceptions of support and work attitudes: A meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, TWH: twhng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNg, TWH=rp01088en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1059601107313307en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-43949128784en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros143485-
dc.identifier.volume33en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage243en_US
dc.identifier.epage268en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256102000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, TWH=8564407300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSorensen, KL=8564407500en_US

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