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Article: How job pressures and extrinsic rewards affect lying behavior

TitleHow job pressures and extrinsic rewards affect lying behavior
Authors
KeywordsExtrinsic Rewards
Job Pressure
Lying Behavior
Issue Date2005
Citation
International Journal Of Conflict Management, 2005, v. 16 n. 3, p. 287-300 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study investigates how two situational elements influence people's propensity to lie about their own performance. We hypothesized that (a) people are more likely to lie when rewarded for doing so, (b) performance pressures at work lead people to lie about their performance, and c) the joint effect of the two elements led to the highest level of lying. Reward and pressure were manipulated in ah experiment with 140 participants. The findings support both hypotheses. The results have implications for the manner in which corporations pressure and reward their employees, suggesting that unsavory behavior such as lying is a natural outgrowth of high pressure, high reward work situations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177979
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.744
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.763
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGrover, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:41:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:41:08Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Conflict Management, 2005, v. 16 n. 3, p. 287-300en_US
dc.identifier.issn1044-4068en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177979-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates how two situational elements influence people's propensity to lie about their own performance. We hypothesized that (a) people are more likely to lie when rewarded for doing so, (b) performance pressures at work lead people to lie about their performance, and c) the joint effect of the two elements led to the highest level of lying. Reward and pressure were manipulated in ah experiment with 140 participants. The findings support both hypotheses. The results have implications for the manner in which corporations pressure and reward their employees, suggesting that unsavory behavior such as lying is a natural outgrowth of high pressure, high reward work situations.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Conflict Managementen_US
dc.subjectExtrinsic Rewardsen_US
dc.subjectJob Pressureen_US
dc.subjectLying Behavioren_US
dc.titleHow job pressures and extrinsic rewards affect lying behavioren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHui, C: chunhui@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHui, C=rp01069en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/eb022933en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34047263779en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34047263779&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage287en_US
dc.identifier.epage300en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242260500005-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGrover, SL=7203009092en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, C=7202876939en_US

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