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Article: When Arousal Influences Ad Evaluation and Valence Does Not (and Vice Versa)

TitleWhen Arousal Influences Ad Evaluation and Valence Does Not (and Vice Versa)
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/713950/description#description
Citation
Journal Of Consumer Psychology, 2001, v. 11 n. 1, p. 43-55 How to Cite?
AbstractThis research examines, across 2 studies, the interplay between the valence and arousal components of affective states and the affective tone of a target ad. In the first study, music was used to induce a pleasant or unpleasant mood, while controlling for arousal. Participants were subsequently exposed to an ad that either had a positive-affective tone or was ambiguous in its affective tone. As predicted, the valence of the affective state colored the evaluation of the ad in a mood-congruent direction, but this coloring effect occurred only when the ad had an ambiguous-affective tone. In the second study, the target ad had a clear positive or negative affective tone, and the valence and arousal dimensions of the mood state were manipulated independently. As predicted, the arousal dimension, but not the valence dimension, influenced ad evaluation. Ad evaluations were more polarized in the direction of the ad's affective tone under high arousal than under low arousal. This effect was more pronounced for self-referent evaluations (e.g., "I like the ad") than for object-referent evaluations (e.g., "The ad is good"), favoring an attributional explanation - the excitation transfer hypothesis - over an attention-narrowing explanation - the dynamic complexity hypothesis. Taken together, the results of the 2 studies stress the important contingency of the affective tone of the ad, when examining the effects of the valence and arousal dimensions of a person's affective state on ad evaluation. The results also provide additional insights into how and when affect serves as information in judgment processes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177890
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.009
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.973
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGorn, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorPham, MTen_US
dc.contributor.authorSin, LYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:40:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:40:43Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Consumer Psychology, 2001, v. 11 n. 1, p. 43-55en_US
dc.identifier.issn1057-7408en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177890-
dc.description.abstractThis research examines, across 2 studies, the interplay between the valence and arousal components of affective states and the affective tone of a target ad. In the first study, music was used to induce a pleasant or unpleasant mood, while controlling for arousal. Participants were subsequently exposed to an ad that either had a positive-affective tone or was ambiguous in its affective tone. As predicted, the valence of the affective state colored the evaluation of the ad in a mood-congruent direction, but this coloring effect occurred only when the ad had an ambiguous-affective tone. In the second study, the target ad had a clear positive or negative affective tone, and the valence and arousal dimensions of the mood state were manipulated independently. As predicted, the arousal dimension, but not the valence dimension, influenced ad evaluation. Ad evaluations were more polarized in the direction of the ad's affective tone under high arousal than under low arousal. This effect was more pronounced for self-referent evaluations (e.g., "I like the ad") than for object-referent evaluations (e.g., "The ad is good"), favoring an attributional explanation - the excitation transfer hypothesis - over an attention-narrowing explanation - the dynamic complexity hypothesis. Taken together, the results of the 2 studies stress the important contingency of the affective tone of the ad, when examining the effects of the valence and arousal dimensions of a person's affective state on ad evaluation. The results also provide additional insights into how and when affect serves as information in judgment processes.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/713950/description#descriptionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Consumer Psychologyen_US
dc.titleWhen Arousal Influences Ad Evaluation and Valence Does Not (and Vice Versa)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGorn, G: gorn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGorn, G=rp01063en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1207/15327660152054030en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035595884en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035595884&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage43en_US
dc.identifier.epage55en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGorn, G=6603382918en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPham, MT=7102271912en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSin, LY=36824422800en_US

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