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Article: The importance of visualisation in concept design

TitleThe importance of visualisation in concept design
Authors
KeywordsConceptual Design
Marketing
Psychology Of Design
Issue Date2001
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/destud
Citation
Design Studies, 2001, v. 22 n. 1, p. 5-26 How to Cite?
AbstractThis research seeks to advance our understanding of how visualisation can facilitate concept design. It focuses on how designers' use of a specific cognitive process, visualisation, can influence the development of design concepts. The paper presents a conceptual framework that links the type of visualisation (memory vs imagination) and the content of visualisation (incorporation of the end user) to the nature of the design process and to the nature of the design outcome, i.e. its originality, usefulness, and customer appeal. Two experiments are presented that test the propositions that flow from the proposed model. The results indicate that the designer's experience in the design process improves in terms of the difficulty experienced in designing the product and information value, as a function of whether the imaginative visualisation is used, and whether or not the end user is incorporated in the visualisation. Additionally, visualisation, by the designer, that involves both imagination and images of the end user, results in designs that are perceived to be more useful by the end user. This effect, however, is not realised when memory visualisation and images of the end user are combined. Finally, and most importantly, visualising the end user in combination with imagination-based visualisation led to designs that were significantly more appealing to the customer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177881
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.07
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.056
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDahl, DWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChattopadhyay, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorGorn, GJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:40:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:40:41Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationDesign Studies, 2001, v. 22 n. 1, p. 5-26en_US
dc.identifier.issn0142-694Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177881-
dc.description.abstractThis research seeks to advance our understanding of how visualisation can facilitate concept design. It focuses on how designers' use of a specific cognitive process, visualisation, can influence the development of design concepts. The paper presents a conceptual framework that links the type of visualisation (memory vs imagination) and the content of visualisation (incorporation of the end user) to the nature of the design process and to the nature of the design outcome, i.e. its originality, usefulness, and customer appeal. Two experiments are presented that test the propositions that flow from the proposed model. The results indicate that the designer's experience in the design process improves in terms of the difficulty experienced in designing the product and information value, as a function of whether the imaginative visualisation is used, and whether or not the end user is incorporated in the visualisation. Additionally, visualisation, by the designer, that involves both imagination and images of the end user, results in designs that are perceived to be more useful by the end user. This effect, however, is not realised when memory visualisation and images of the end user are combined. Finally, and most importantly, visualising the end user in combination with imagination-based visualisation led to designs that were significantly more appealing to the customer.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/destuden_US
dc.relation.ispartofDesign Studiesen_US
dc.subjectConceptual Designen_US
dc.subjectMarketingen_US
dc.subjectPsychology Of Designen_US
dc.titleThe importance of visualisation in concept designen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGorn, GJ: gorn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGorn, GJ=rp01063en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0142-694X(99)00028-9en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035153147en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035153147&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage5en_US
dc.identifier.epage26en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDahl, DW=7102695662en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChattopadhyay, A=7202920671en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGorn, GJ=6603382918en_US

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