File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Effects of color as an executional cue in advertising: They're in the shade

TitleEffects of color as an executional cue in advertising: They're in the shade
Authors
KeywordsAdvertising And Media
Buyer Behavior
Marketing
Issue Date1997
PublisherINFORMS. The Journal's web site is located at http://mansci.pubs.informs.org
Citation
Management Science, 1997, v. 43 n. 10, p. 1387-1400 How to Cite?
AbstractIn designing print ads, one of the decisions the advertiser must make is which color(s) to use as executional cues in the ad. Typically, color decisions are based on intuition and anecdotal evidence. To provide guidelines for these decisions, this research proposes and tests a conceptual framework linking the hue, chroma, and value of the color(s) in an ad to consumers' feelings and attitudes. In an experimental study, the three dimensions of color used in an ad are manipulated using a between-subjects design. The results support the hypotheses that ads containing colors with a higher level of value lead to greater liking for the ad, and this effect is mediated by the greater feelings of relaxation elicited by the higher value color. Feelings play an equally important role in the effect of chroma. Consistent with the hypotheses, higher levels of chroma elicit greater feelings of excitement, which in turn increase ad likeability. A follow-up study found that although managers often select higher value and higher chroma colors, in a large number of cases they do not. The findings of both studies are integrated in our discussion of the importance of value and chroma in increasing the range of options available to a manager faced with the selection of colors in an ad.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177860
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.741
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.384
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGorn, GJen_US
dc.contributor.authorChattopadhyay, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorYi, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorDahl, DWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:40:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:40:36Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationManagement Science, 1997, v. 43 n. 10, p. 1387-1400en_US
dc.identifier.issn0025-1909en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177860-
dc.description.abstractIn designing print ads, one of the decisions the advertiser must make is which color(s) to use as executional cues in the ad. Typically, color decisions are based on intuition and anecdotal evidence. To provide guidelines for these decisions, this research proposes and tests a conceptual framework linking the hue, chroma, and value of the color(s) in an ad to consumers' feelings and attitudes. In an experimental study, the three dimensions of color used in an ad are manipulated using a between-subjects design. The results support the hypotheses that ads containing colors with a higher level of value lead to greater liking for the ad, and this effect is mediated by the greater feelings of relaxation elicited by the higher value color. Feelings play an equally important role in the effect of chroma. Consistent with the hypotheses, higher levels of chroma elicit greater feelings of excitement, which in turn increase ad likeability. A follow-up study found that although managers often select higher value and higher chroma colors, in a large number of cases they do not. The findings of both studies are integrated in our discussion of the importance of value and chroma in increasing the range of options available to a manager faced with the selection of colors in an ad.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherINFORMS. The Journal's web site is located at http://mansci.pubs.informs.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofManagement Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAdvertising And Mediaen_US
dc.subjectBuyer Behavioren_US
dc.subjectMarketingen_US
dc.titleEffects of color as an executional cue in advertising: They're in the shadeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGorn, GJ: gorn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGorn, GJ=rp01063en_US
dc.description.naturepostprinten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1287/mnsc.43.10.1387-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031249984en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031249984&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume43en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1387en_US
dc.identifier.epage1400en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGorn, GJ=6603382918en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChattopadhyay, A=7202920671en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYi, T=7102230384en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDahl, DW=7102695662en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats