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Article: "So, what test do you prefer?" Negotiating politic behaviour in an L2 prenatal genetic counselling setting in Hong Kong

Title"So, what test do you prefer?" Negotiating politic behaviour in an L2 prenatal genetic counselling setting in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsGenetic Counselling
Informed Choice
L2 Context
Non-Native Speaker Interaction
Nondirective Counselling
Politic Behaviour
Issue Date2009
PublisherMouton de Gruyter. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.com/rs/384_7282_ENU_h.htm
Citation
Journal Of Politeness Research, 2009, v. 5 n. 1, p. 33-51 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious research in the field of politeness studies indicates that different discourse genres are characterized by different degrees of adherence to politeness rules (Lakoff 1989). In the genetic counselling setting, we propose that verbal behaviour should be analyzed within a broader framework of politic verbal behaviour (Watts 1989, 2003). We examine an L2 English context in Hong Kong to illustrate how the sociocultural context shapes the notion of politic behaviour. By sociocultural context, we are referring to the combination of language used, in this case English as a second language, the background of the interactants, and the institutional setting in which the interactions take place. In genetic counselling, politic behaviour is influenced by two well-established concepts: informed choice and nondirective counselling. Informed choice concerns the decision that a pregnant woman makes regarding genetic screening and testing. Nondirectiveness reflects the autonomous nature of the choice and the fact that the health care provider should act as a facilitator of the woman's choice, avoiding any imposition. Given these institutional goals, we discuss how health care providers negotiate politic behaviour to facilitate the decision-making process and illustrate that considerations of language and participant background take precedence over nondirectiveness in this L2 context. © Walter de Gruyter.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177611
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 0.889
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.441
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZayts, Oen_US
dc.contributor.authorKang, MAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:37:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:37:58Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Politeness Research, 2009, v. 5 n. 1, p. 33-51en_US
dc.identifier.issn1612-5681en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177611-
dc.description.abstractPrevious research in the field of politeness studies indicates that different discourse genres are characterized by different degrees of adherence to politeness rules (Lakoff 1989). In the genetic counselling setting, we propose that verbal behaviour should be analyzed within a broader framework of politic verbal behaviour (Watts 1989, 2003). We examine an L2 English context in Hong Kong to illustrate how the sociocultural context shapes the notion of politic behaviour. By sociocultural context, we are referring to the combination of language used, in this case English as a second language, the background of the interactants, and the institutional setting in which the interactions take place. In genetic counselling, politic behaviour is influenced by two well-established concepts: informed choice and nondirective counselling. Informed choice concerns the decision that a pregnant woman makes regarding genetic screening and testing. Nondirectiveness reflects the autonomous nature of the choice and the fact that the health care provider should act as a facilitator of the woman's choice, avoiding any imposition. Given these institutional goals, we discuss how health care providers negotiate politic behaviour to facilitate the decision-making process and illustrate that considerations of language and participant background take precedence over nondirectiveness in this L2 context. © Walter de Gruyter.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMouton de Gruyter. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.com/rs/384_7282_ENU_h.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Politeness Researchen_US
dc.subjectGenetic Counsellingen_US
dc.subjectInformed Choiceen_US
dc.subjectL2 Contexten_US
dc.subjectNon-Native Speaker Interactionen_US
dc.subjectNondirective Counsellingen_US
dc.subjectPolitic Behaviouren_US
dc.title"So, what test do you prefer?" Negotiating politic behaviour in an L2 prenatal genetic counselling setting in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZayts, O: zayts@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZayts, O=rp01211en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/JPLR.2009.003en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77950224256en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros146172-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77950224256&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage33en_US
dc.identifier.epage51en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1613-4877-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264120500003-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZayts, O=35770053700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKang, MA=36198419100en_US

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