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Article: Gender and the "virtue of violence": Creating a new vision of political engagement through the 1911 revolution

TitleGender and the "virtue of violence": Creating a new vision of political engagement through the 1911 revolution
Authors
KeywordsChina
Gender
Political Change
The 1911 Revolution
Violence
Issue Date2011
Citation
Frontiers Of History In China, 2011, v. 6 n. 4, p. 485-504 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this article, we explore the way men and women used the idea of violence to transform their broader political roles in their desired new Republic. We argue that the espousal of violence, whether or not actually undertaken, became an important part of the accoutrements of progressive political forces in China at this time. Violent action was perceived as virtuous rather than villainous among reformers and radicals in the late Qing and early Republic. We demonstrate that the impact and significance of this turn to violence differed for men and for women. For men, the ability and willingness to take violent action symbolized a break with the effete literati of the imperial past by their envisaging of a muscular Confucianism; for women, it provided a platform on which their claims to equal citizenship with men could be performed. The gendered nature of the virtue of violence within this rapidly changing political context produced unexpected results for both male and female political aspirants. © 2011 Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177584
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.102
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:37:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:37:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers Of History In China, 2011, v. 6 n. 4, p. 485-504en_US
dc.identifier.issn1673-3401en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177584-
dc.description.abstractIn this article, we explore the way men and women used the idea of violence to transform their broader political roles in their desired new Republic. We argue that the espousal of violence, whether or not actually undertaken, became an important part of the accoutrements of progressive political forces in China at this time. Violent action was perceived as virtuous rather than villainous among reformers and radicals in the late Qing and early Republic. We demonstrate that the impact and significance of this turn to violence differed for men and for women. For men, the ability and willingness to take violent action symbolized a break with the effete literati of the imperial past by their envisaging of a muscular Confucianism; for women, it provided a platform on which their claims to equal citizenship with men could be performed. The gendered nature of the virtue of violence within this rapidly changing political context produced unexpected results for both male and female political aspirants. © 2011 Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers of History in Chinaen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Changeen_US
dc.subjectThe 1911 Revolutionen_US
dc.subjectViolenceen_US
dc.titleGender and the "virtue of violence": Creating a new vision of political engagement through the 1911 revolutionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailEdwards, L: ledwards@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityEdwards, L=rp01234en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11462-011-0138-8en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81255185968en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros206450-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-81255185968&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage485en_US
dc.identifier.epage504en_US
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEdwards, L=7201757947en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, L=7404125228en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10058128-

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