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Conference Paper: A design for investigating the association of birth weight, weight change during life course with adult hypertension in Hong Kong women

TitleA design for investigating the association of birth weight, weight change during life course with adult hypertension in Hong Kong women
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Issue Date2009
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=DOH
Citation
The 6th World Congress on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, Santiago, Chile, 19-22 November 2009. In Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 2009, v. 1 suppl. S1, p. S219, abstract P-6A-270 How to Cite?
Abstract"Fetal origins hypothesis" by Barker in 1990 is a well known hypothesis. One of the key finding was that low birth weight was associated with higher adult systolic blood pressure. However, in 2002, Huxley et al argued that birth weight had little relevance in determining blood pressure levels in later life. But after that, several studies argued against it until now. In addition, some experts think that change in size between birth and current rather than fetal biology itself affect the blood pressure, which means the fetal origins hypothesis must be weighed against a "postnatal origins hypothesis". Therefore, it is important to explore what is the interaction between later body weight change and fetal programming on the effect of BP ...
DescriptionPoster Presentation: P-6A-270
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177425
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.733
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.740

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXie, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, SCen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, XHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSu, XFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-18T05:10:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-18T05:10:28Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 6th World Congress on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, Santiago, Chile, 19-22 November 2009. In Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 2009, v. 1 suppl. S1, p. S219, abstract P-6A-270en_US
dc.identifier.issn2040-1744-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177425-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation: P-6A-270-
dc.description.abstract"Fetal origins hypothesis" by Barker in 1990 is a well known hypothesis. One of the key finding was that low birth weight was associated with higher adult systolic blood pressure. However, in 2002, Huxley et al argued that birth weight had little relevance in determining blood pressure levels in later life. But after that, several studies argued against it until now. In addition, some experts think that change in size between birth and current rather than fetal biology itself affect the blood pressure, which means the fetal origins hypothesis must be weighed against a "postnatal origins hypothesis". Therefore, it is important to explore what is the interaction between later body weight change and fetal programming on the effect of BP ...-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=DOH-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Developmental Origins of Health and Diseaseen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.titleA design for investigating the association of birth weight, weight change during life course with adult hypertension in Hong Kong womenen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailXie, Y: yjxie@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S2040174409990067-
dc.identifier.hkuros205268en_US
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. S1-
dc.identifier.spageS219-
dc.identifier.epageS219-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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