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postgraduate thesis: Decoding the hidden A-gender: the gender factor in Cantonese utterance-final particles

TitleDecoding the hidden A-gender: the gender factor in Cantonese utterance-final particles
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Tam, W. A. [譚韻芳]. (2012). Decoding the hidden A-gender : the gender factor in Cantonese utterance-final particles. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4839501
AbstractThis research targets the gender differences in the use of utterance-final particles in Cantonese with respect to the act of sajiao (撒嬌) under the speech act framework proposed by J. L. Austin. Sajiao is defined as the adorable petulance of a spoiled child or young woman who seeks material or immaterial benefits from an unwilling listener. It is hypothesized in this study that the use of utterance-final particles is not generally gender-linked. It is further suggested that some of the utterance-final particles are loaded with gender features which could feminize the utterances, thus performing the act of sajiao. This research has identified five utterance-final particles, including a newly emerged particle that has never been examined in the previous literature, which are believed to be gender-linked, namely 添 “tim1”, LU “lu3”, 噃 “bo3”, 喇喎 “laa3wo3” and 咖呵 “gaa3ho2”, and it has also analyzed meanings that are denoted by these five particles and the two genders’ usage of them. The investigator proposed that the first three particles could help soften the tone of an utterance, while at the same time, they add cuteness, so that the speakers present a more amiable impression of themselves, and thus could help them please or flatter the opposite sex. The two utterance-final particle clusters 喇喎 “laa3wo3” and 咖呵 “gaa3ho2”, on the other hand, are related to implicit demands. By skillfully employing these seemingly softer particles, female speakers could make the men who are appeared to be stronger to yield and satisfy their demands without creating any hard feelings.
DegreeMaster of Arts
SubjectCantonese dialects - Particles - Sex differences.
Dept/ProgramLinguistics

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTam, Wan-fong, Amy.-
dc.contributor.author譚韻芳.-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationTam, W. A. [譚韻芳]. (2012). Decoding the hidden A-gender : the gender factor in Cantonese utterance-final particles. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4839501-
dc.description.abstractThis research targets the gender differences in the use of utterance-final particles in Cantonese with respect to the act of sajiao (撒嬌) under the speech act framework proposed by J. L. Austin. Sajiao is defined as the adorable petulance of a spoiled child or young woman who seeks material or immaterial benefits from an unwilling listener. It is hypothesized in this study that the use of utterance-final particles is not generally gender-linked. It is further suggested that some of the utterance-final particles are loaded with gender features which could feminize the utterances, thus performing the act of sajiao. This research has identified five utterance-final particles, including a newly emerged particle that has never been examined in the previous literature, which are believed to be gender-linked, namely 添 “tim1”, LU “lu3”, 噃 “bo3”, 喇喎 “laa3wo3” and 咖呵 “gaa3ho2”, and it has also analyzed meanings that are denoted by these five particles and the two genders’ usage of them. The investigator proposed that the first three particles could help soften the tone of an utterance, while at the same time, they add cuteness, so that the speakers present a more amiable impression of themselves, and thus could help them please or flatter the opposite sex. The two utterance-final particle clusters 喇喎 “laa3wo3” and 咖呵 “gaa3ho2”, on the other hand, are related to implicit demands. By skillfully employing these seemingly softer particles, female speakers could make the men who are appeared to be stronger to yield and satisfy their demands without creating any hard feelings.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48395018-
dc.subject.lcshCantonese dialects - Particles - Sex differences.-
dc.titleDecoding the hidden A-gender: the gender factor in Cantonese utterance-final particles-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4839501-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Arts-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineLinguistics-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4839501-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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