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postgraduate thesis: Documenting the evolution of signage and shelters for buses in Hong Kong (1960s to 2000s)

TitleDocumenting the evolution of signage and shelters for buses in Hong Kong (1960s to 2000s)
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Kwok, K. S. [郭耿華]. (2012). Documenting the evolution of signage and shelters for buses in Hong Kong (1960s to 2000s). (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4834519
AbstractHong Kong has an extensive network of public bus services covering almost all areas of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon, New Territories and Lantau Island. It is doubtless that the long history and reliable public bus service for the general masses has helped make Hong Kong achieving a world-class efficient and comprehensive public transport network. The operation of bus services can be traced back to the 1920's when, in 1921, the Vehicles and Traffic Regulation Ordinance set out the fares, stopping points and bus specifications for four bus routes serving Kowloon Peninsula. The first franchises were awarded in 1933 to China Motor Bus Company Ltd and Kowloon Motor Bus Company (1933) Limited (KMB). The third franchised bus company was New Lantao Bus Company (1973) Ltd which has operated franchised services on Lantau Island since 1979. In 1991 Citybus Limited, which since 1979 had operated a shuttle service for United Services Dockyard workers with a single bus and, later, some residential services, was granted a franchise for operating one Hong Kong Island bus route and further routes from 1993 and 1995. In 1998 CMB's history of operating bus services came to an end when New World First Bus Services Limited (NWFB) won the tender to operate 88 routes previously operated under CMB's franchise. However, with diverse and primarily private nature of bus operators, and the lack of motivation and hence regulations of any sort of the then colonial government and current SAR Government in mandating the documentation of bus-related relics and archive, there is no policy, mechanism or institution of any sort to provide records of history of this important form of public transit service in Hong Kong. Streets are the foreground of our buildings and the backdrop to everyday lives and contain valuable cultural symbols. The number of signs, bollards and guardrails are increasing over the years, without intended coordination. This result in streetscape which is unsigtly and seemingly lacking character. The example of England in rediscovering and preserving the street character is noteworthy. Since England has launched campaign of “Save Our Streets”, every sign has been concerned in towns or villages, such as traditional traffic direction signs, or “fingerposts”, which are a cherished feature of the English countryside and suburbs. English Heritage has joined forces with the Department for Transport to call on local authorities to retain, repair and reintroduce fingerposts where appropriate. Back to Hong Kong, as time passed, some of the bus service companies which have witnessed the historic development of this important service have either closed down or changed their business direction. All of the historic information has been lost other than their financial report. Antique bus stop or signs were nowhere to be found. Those information may only gather from some of the bus fans’ collection. To remedy such anomaly and loss of historic information, a designated library or museum should gather the history of bus services information at the past with easy public access. And instead of relying on the will and interest of individual companies, the government should at lead take the lead in coordinating such work.
DegreeMaster of Science in Conservation
SubjectBus stops - China - Hong Kong.
Dept/ProgramConservation

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Kan-wah, Steven.-
dc.contributor.author郭耿華.-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationKwok, K. S. [郭耿華]. (2012). Documenting the evolution of signage and shelters for buses in Hong Kong (1960s to 2000s). (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4834519-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong has an extensive network of public bus services covering almost all areas of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon, New Territories and Lantau Island. It is doubtless that the long history and reliable public bus service for the general masses has helped make Hong Kong achieving a world-class efficient and comprehensive public transport network. The operation of bus services can be traced back to the 1920's when, in 1921, the Vehicles and Traffic Regulation Ordinance set out the fares, stopping points and bus specifications for four bus routes serving Kowloon Peninsula. The first franchises were awarded in 1933 to China Motor Bus Company Ltd and Kowloon Motor Bus Company (1933) Limited (KMB). The third franchised bus company was New Lantao Bus Company (1973) Ltd which has operated franchised services on Lantau Island since 1979. In 1991 Citybus Limited, which since 1979 had operated a shuttle service for United Services Dockyard workers with a single bus and, later, some residential services, was granted a franchise for operating one Hong Kong Island bus route and further routes from 1993 and 1995. In 1998 CMB's history of operating bus services came to an end when New World First Bus Services Limited (NWFB) won the tender to operate 88 routes previously operated under CMB's franchise. However, with diverse and primarily private nature of bus operators, and the lack of motivation and hence regulations of any sort of the then colonial government and current SAR Government in mandating the documentation of bus-related relics and archive, there is no policy, mechanism or institution of any sort to provide records of history of this important form of public transit service in Hong Kong. Streets are the foreground of our buildings and the backdrop to everyday lives and contain valuable cultural symbols. The number of signs, bollards and guardrails are increasing over the years, without intended coordination. This result in streetscape which is unsigtly and seemingly lacking character. The example of England in rediscovering and preserving the street character is noteworthy. Since England has launched campaign of “Save Our Streets”, every sign has been concerned in towns or villages, such as traditional traffic direction signs, or “fingerposts”, which are a cherished feature of the English countryside and suburbs. English Heritage has joined forces with the Department for Transport to call on local authorities to retain, repair and reintroduce fingerposts where appropriate. Back to Hong Kong, as time passed, some of the bus service companies which have witnessed the historic development of this important service have either closed down or changed their business direction. All of the historic information has been lost other than their financial report. Antique bus stop or signs were nowhere to be found. Those information may only gather from some of the bus fans’ collection. To remedy such anomaly and loss of historic information, a designated library or museum should gather the history of bus services information at the past with easy public access. And instead of relying on the will and interest of individual companies, the government should at lead take the lead in coordinating such work.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48345192-
dc.subject.lcshBus stops - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.titleDocumenting the evolution of signage and shelters for buses in Hong Kong (1960s to 2000s)-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4834519-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Science in Conservation-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineConservation-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4834519-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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