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Article: Population genetics of colonizing success of weedy rye in Northern California

TitlePopulation genetics of colonizing success of weedy rye in Northern California
Authors
KeywordsColonization
Gene Flow
Genetic Diversity
Outcrossing Rate
Issue Date1992
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00122/index.htm
Citation
Theoretical And Applied Genetics, 1992, v. 83 n. 3, p. 321-329 How to Cite?
AbstractGenetic parameters of 11 weedy rye populations located in California's northern mountain area and the adjoining Oregon border were compared with those of the putative parents, wild species Secale montamim and cultivated rye S. cereale. All weedy populations exhibited high levels of genetic variation as determined by isozyme analysis. On average, 44% of the isozyme loci were polymorphic, total genetic diversity was 0.30; and number of alleles per locus was 1.65. High genetic identities, averaging 0.994 ± 0.005 between populations, indicated that little genetic differentiation has occurred among these weedy populations since the initial colonization. Lack of population differentiation could be attributed to a wind-pollinated, self-incompatible breeding system resulting in extensive gene flow among weedy populations, and between weedy populations and local cultivars of rye. Multilocus outcrossing rates of weedy populations ranged from 0.86 to 0.97. The estimated levels of gene flow using the private-alleles method were high among weedy populations, and between cv 'Merced' and weedy populations, with estimated Nm values of 14.50 and 8.21, respectively. The colonizing success of weedy rye is discussed and a strategy for its conservation recommended. © 1992 Springer-Verlag.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177174
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.9
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.930

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorCorke, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-04T02:30:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-04T02:30:14Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationTheoretical And Applied Genetics, 1992, v. 83 n. 3, p. 321-329en_US
dc.identifier.issn0040-5752en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177174-
dc.description.abstractGenetic parameters of 11 weedy rye populations located in California's northern mountain area and the adjoining Oregon border were compared with those of the putative parents, wild species Secale montamim and cultivated rye S. cereale. All weedy populations exhibited high levels of genetic variation as determined by isozyme analysis. On average, 44% of the isozyme loci were polymorphic, total genetic diversity was 0.30; and number of alleles per locus was 1.65. High genetic identities, averaging 0.994 ± 0.005 between populations, indicated that little genetic differentiation has occurred among these weedy populations since the initial colonization. Lack of population differentiation could be attributed to a wind-pollinated, self-incompatible breeding system resulting in extensive gene flow among weedy populations, and between weedy populations and local cultivars of rye. Multilocus outcrossing rates of weedy populations ranged from 0.86 to 0.97. The estimated levels of gene flow using the private-alleles method were high among weedy populations, and between cv 'Merced' and weedy populations, with estimated Nm values of 14.50 and 8.21, respectively. The colonizing success of weedy rye is discussed and a strategy for its conservation recommended. © 1992 Springer-Verlag.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00122/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTheoretical and Applied Geneticsen_US
dc.subjectColonizationen_US
dc.subjectGene Flowen_US
dc.subjectGenetic Diversityen_US
dc.subjectOutcrossing Rateen_US
dc.titlePopulation genetics of colonizing success of weedy rye in Northern Californiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSun, M: meisun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCorke, H: harold@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySun, M=rp00779en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCorke, H=rp00688en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF00224278en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0001351166en_US
dc.identifier.volume83en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage321en_US
dc.identifier.epage329en_US
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, M=7403181447en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorke, H=7007102942en_US

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