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Article: Glenohumeral mobility in primates

TitleGlenohumeral mobility in primates
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/FPR
Citation
Folia Primatologica, 2006, v. 78 n. 1, p. 1-18 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study refutes the traditional idea that the glenohumeral joint of hominoids is more mobile than that of other primates, a belief that forms a basis for the two prominent theories of hominoid evolution. According to the brachiation theory, many anatomical features of the hominoid shoulder (including those of the glenohumeral joint) increase shoulder mobility and are interpreted as adaptations for brachiation. The slow climbing theory explains the same set of features as adaptations for slow climbing. The slow-climbing primates should therefore also possess these features, and their glenohumeral mobility should be the same as that of hominoids and be higher than that of other primates. This study presents three-dimensional glenohumeral mobility data, measured using a single video camera method on fresh specimens. The results show that the hominoid glenohumeral joint is actually less mobile than those of non-hominoid primates, including the habitually slow-climbing lorines, but it is characterized by a smooth excursion in the scapulocranial direction. Copyright © 2007 S. Karger AG.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176322
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.778
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.372
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, LKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:09:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:09:20Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationFolia Primatologica, 2006, v. 78 n. 1, p. 1-18en_US
dc.identifier.issn0015-5713en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176322-
dc.description.abstractThis study refutes the traditional idea that the glenohumeral joint of hominoids is more mobile than that of other primates, a belief that forms a basis for the two prominent theories of hominoid evolution. According to the brachiation theory, many anatomical features of the hominoid shoulder (including those of the glenohumeral joint) increase shoulder mobility and are interpreted as adaptations for brachiation. The slow climbing theory explains the same set of features as adaptations for slow climbing. The slow-climbing primates should therefore also possess these features, and their glenohumeral mobility should be the same as that of hominoids and be higher than that of other primates. This study presents three-dimensional glenohumeral mobility data, measured using a single video camera method on fresh specimens. The results show that the hominoid glenohumeral joint is actually less mobile than those of non-hominoid primates, including the habitually slow-climbing lorines, but it is characterized by a smooth excursion in the scapulocranial direction. Copyright © 2007 S. Karger AG.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/FPRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFolia Primatologicaen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Physiologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Evolutionen_US
dc.subject.meshCadaveren_US
dc.subject.meshLocomotionen_US
dc.subject.meshPrimates - Anatomy & Histology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshShoulder Joint - Anatomy & Histology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSpecies Specificityen_US
dc.titleGlenohumeral mobility in primatesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, LK: lapki@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, LK=rp00536en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000095682en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17170553-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845747718en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845747718&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume78en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage18en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242999500001-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, LK=7403540426en_US

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