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Article: Sources of information and health beliefs related to SARS and avian influenza among Chinese Communities in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, compared to the general population in these countries

TitleSources of information and health beliefs related to SARS and avian influenza among Chinese Communities in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, compared to the general population in these countries
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529
Citation
International Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2009, v. 16 n. 1, p. 49-57 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Ethnic minorities in Europe such as the Chinese may need a special strategy with regard to risk communication about emerging infectious diseases. To engage them in precautionary actions, it is important to know their information sources, knowledge, and health beliefs. Purpose: This study's purpose is to study the use of information sources, knowledge, and health beliefs related to SARS and avian flu of Chinese people in the UK and The Netherlands, and to make comparisons with the general population in these countries. Method: Results of a self-administered questionnaire among 300 British/Dutch Chinese were compared to data obtained from a computer-assisted phone survey among the general population (n∈=∈800). Results: British/Dutch Chinese got most information about emerging diseases from family and friends, followed by Chinese media and British/Dutch TV. They had less confidence than general groups in their doctor, government agencies, and consumer/patient interest groups. Their knowledge of SARS was high. They had a lower perceived threat than general populations with regard to SARS and avian flu due to a lower perceived severity. They had higher self-efficacy beliefs regarding SARS and avian flu. Conclusion: In case of new outbreaks of SARS/avian flu in China, local authorities in the UK and The Netherlands can best reach Chinese people through informal networks and British/Dutch TV, while trying to improve confidence in information from the government. In communications, the severity of the disease rather than the susceptibility appears to need most attention. © 2009 International Society of Behavioral Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176305
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.872
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVoeten, HACMen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Zwart, Oen_US
dc.contributor.authorVeldhuijzen, IKen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorElam, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbraham, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorBrug, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:08:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:08:33Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2009, v. 16 n. 1, p. 49-57en_US
dc.identifier.issn1070-5503en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176305-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Ethnic minorities in Europe such as the Chinese may need a special strategy with regard to risk communication about emerging infectious diseases. To engage them in precautionary actions, it is important to know their information sources, knowledge, and health beliefs. Purpose: This study's purpose is to study the use of information sources, knowledge, and health beliefs related to SARS and avian flu of Chinese people in the UK and The Netherlands, and to make comparisons with the general population in these countries. Method: Results of a self-administered questionnaire among 300 British/Dutch Chinese were compared to data obtained from a computer-assisted phone survey among the general population (n∈=∈800). Results: British/Dutch Chinese got most information about emerging diseases from family and friends, followed by Chinese media and British/Dutch TV. They had less confidence than general groups in their doctor, government agencies, and consumer/patient interest groups. Their knowledge of SARS was high. They had a lower perceived threat than general populations with regard to SARS and avian flu due to a lower perceived severity. They had higher self-efficacy beliefs regarding SARS and avian flu. Conclusion: In case of new outbreaks of SARS/avian flu in China, local authorities in the UK and The Netherlands can best reach Chinese people through informal networks and British/Dutch TV, while trying to improve confidence in information from the government. In communications, the severity of the disease rather than the susceptibility appears to need most attention. © 2009 International Society of Behavioral Medicine.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCommunicationen_US
dc.subject.meshCultureen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_US
dc.subject.meshEmigrants And Immigrants - Education - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Educationen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5n1 Subtypeen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza In Birds - Prevention & Control - Psychology - Transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - Ethnology - Prevention & Control - Psychology - Transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshInformation Disseminationen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMinority Groups - Education - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNetherlandsen_US
dc.subject.meshPoultryen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.meshRisk-Takingen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacyen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Ethnology - Prevention & Control - Psychology - Transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshSingapore - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTelephoneen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleSources of information and health beliefs related to SARS and avian influenza among Chinese Communities in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, compared to the general population in these countriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailAbraham, T: thomas@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityAbraham, T=rp00578en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12529-008-9006-4en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19184453-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-62149091070en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros148421-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-62149091070&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage49en_US
dc.identifier.epage57en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267826600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVoeten, HACM=6602779052en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Zwart, O=15836625100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVeldhuijzen, IK=6603076038en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, C=35235851800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, X=25958092600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridElam, G=6603424287en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbraham, T=15836927300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrug, J=7005875318en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike3995898-

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