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Article: Inter-unit variability in two ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 automated metabolic gas analysis systems

TitleInter-unit variability in two ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 automated metabolic gas analysis systems
Authors
KeywordsAgreement
Gas Analysis
Parvomedics
Technological Error
Variation
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/biomed/human+physiology/journal/421
Citation
European Journal Of Applied Physiology, 2013, v. 113 n. 3, p. 753-762 How to Cite?
AbstractKnowing the inter-unit variability, especially the technological error, is important when using many physiological measurement systems, yet no such inter-unit analysis has been undertaken on duplicate automated gas analysis systems. This study investigated the inter-unit performance of two identical ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 automated gas analysis systems during a range of submaximal steady-state exercises performed on an electromagnetic cycle ergometer. Fifteen adult males were tested on two separate days a rest, 30, 60, 90, and 120 Watts with the duplicate gas analysis units arranged (1) collaterally (2 min of steady-state expired gas was alternately passed through each system), and (2) simultaneously (identical steady-state expired gas was passed simultaneously through both systems). Total within-subject variation (biological + technological) was determined from the collateral tests, but the unique inter-unit variability (technological error between identical systems) was shown by the simultaneous tests. Absolute percentage errors (APE), coefficient of variations (CV), effect sizes and Bland-Altman analyses were undertaken on the metabolic data, including expired ventilation (V E), oxygen consumption (VO 2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO 2). The few statistically significant differences detected between the two duplicate systems were determined to have small or trivial effect sizes, and their magnitudes to be of little physiological importance. The total within-subject variations for VO 2, VCO 2 and V E each equated to a mean CV and mean APE value of ~4 and ~6 %, whilst the respective inter-unit technological errors equated to ~1.5 and ~2.1 %. The two ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 systems demonstrated excellent inter-unit agreement. © 2012 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176081
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.328
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.145
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, DJen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, HLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:55Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Applied Physiology, 2013, v. 113 n. 3, p. 753-762en_US
dc.identifier.issn1439-6319en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176081-
dc.description.abstractKnowing the inter-unit variability, especially the technological error, is important when using many physiological measurement systems, yet no such inter-unit analysis has been undertaken on duplicate automated gas analysis systems. This study investigated the inter-unit performance of two identical ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 automated gas analysis systems during a range of submaximal steady-state exercises performed on an electromagnetic cycle ergometer. Fifteen adult males were tested on two separate days a rest, 30, 60, 90, and 120 Watts with the duplicate gas analysis units arranged (1) collaterally (2 min of steady-state expired gas was alternately passed through each system), and (2) simultaneously (identical steady-state expired gas was passed simultaneously through both systems). Total within-subject variation (biological + technological) was determined from the collateral tests, but the unique inter-unit variability (technological error between identical systems) was shown by the simultaneous tests. Absolute percentage errors (APE), coefficient of variations (CV), effect sizes and Bland-Altman analyses were undertaken on the metabolic data, including expired ventilation (V E), oxygen consumption (VO 2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO 2). The few statistically significant differences detected between the two duplicate systems were determined to have small or trivial effect sizes, and their magnitudes to be of little physiological importance. The total within-subject variations for VO 2, VCO 2 and V E each equated to a mean CV and mean APE value of ~4 and ~6 %, whilst the respective inter-unit technological errors equated to ~1.5 and ~2.1 %. The two ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 systems demonstrated excellent inter-unit agreement. © 2012 The Author(s).en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/biomed/human+physiology/journal/421en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Applied Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectAgreementen_US
dc.subjectGas Analysisen_US
dc.subjectParvomedicsen_US
dc.subjectTechnological Erroren_US
dc.subjectVariationen_US
dc.titleInter-unit variability in two ParvoMedics TrueOne 2400 automated metabolic gas analysis systemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMacfarlane, DJ: djmac@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMacfarlane, DJ=rp00934en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00421-012-2483-9en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22945269-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84878551050en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros221770-
dc.identifier.spage753en_US
dc.identifier.epage762en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000314773500022-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacfarlane, DJ=7202978517en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, HL=35222773000en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike11199867-

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