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Article: Physiology of elite young male athletes.

TitlePhysiology of elite young male athletes.
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/MSPSC
Citation
Medicine And Sport Science, 2011, v. 56, p. 1-22 How to Cite?
AbstractPerformance in sport takes place within a matrix of bio-cultural characteristics but boys' success in elite youth sport is underpinned by a range of age-and maturity-related physical and physiological variables which act in a sport-specific manner to influence performance. Stature, body mass, and muscle mass increase with growth and maturation and earlier maturing boys are generally taller, heavier, and more muscular than boys of the same chronological age who mature later. Earlier maturing boys also benefit from changes in body shape which are advantageous in many sports. Marked increases in muscle strength and muscle power are expressed during adolescence. The muscle enzyme profile needed to promote the anaerobic generation of energy is enhanced as children move through adolescence into young adulthood. Aerobic fitness benefits from age and/or maturation-related increases in stroke volume, haemoglobin concentration, and muscle mass. These individual differences are most pronounced at 12-15 years when participation in elite youth sport is at its peak. Many boys fulfil their potential, gain great pleasure from elite youth sport and become elite adult sportsmen. Other equally talented boys are denied access to elite youth sport through selection policies which are influenced by stage of maturation or age relative to the beginning of the selection year. Others drop-out prematurely through early specialisation in a sport inappropriate for their late adolescent or adult physique. Boys are not mini-men and coaches and parents should focus on providing opportunities for all boys and on nurturing talent irrespective of the ticking of individual biological clocks. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176071
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.380

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcmanus, AMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationMedicine And Sport Science, 2011, v. 56, p. 1-22en_US
dc.identifier.issn0254-5020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176071-
dc.description.abstractPerformance in sport takes place within a matrix of bio-cultural characteristics but boys' success in elite youth sport is underpinned by a range of age-and maturity-related physical and physiological variables which act in a sport-specific manner to influence performance. Stature, body mass, and muscle mass increase with growth and maturation and earlier maturing boys are generally taller, heavier, and more muscular than boys of the same chronological age who mature later. Earlier maturing boys also benefit from changes in body shape which are advantageous in many sports. Marked increases in muscle strength and muscle power are expressed during adolescence. The muscle enzyme profile needed to promote the anaerobic generation of energy is enhanced as children move through adolescence into young adulthood. Aerobic fitness benefits from age and/or maturation-related increases in stroke volume, haemoglobin concentration, and muscle mass. These individual differences are most pronounced at 12-15 years when participation in elite youth sport is at its peak. Many boys fulfil their potential, gain great pleasure from elite youth sport and become elite adult sportsmen. Other equally talented boys are denied access to elite youth sport through selection policies which are influenced by stage of maturation or age relative to the beginning of the selection year. Others drop-out prematurely through early specialisation in a sport inappropriate for their late adolescent or adult physique. Boys are not mini-men and coaches and parents should focus on providing opportunities for all boys and on nurturing talent irrespective of the ticking of individual biological clocks. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/MSPSCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMedicine and sport scienceen_US
dc.rightsMedicine and Sport Science. Copyright © S Karger AG.-
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAthletic Performance - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Compositionen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Sizeen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolism - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshExercise - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLactates - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Fatigue - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Strength - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumption - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitness - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRecovery Of Functionen_US
dc.titlePhysiology of elite young male athletes.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcManus, AM: alimac@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcManus, AM=rp00936en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000320618-
dc.identifier.pmid21178364-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953010000en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros204282-
dc.identifier.hkuros195553-
dc.identifier.volume56en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage22en_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArmstrong, N=7101927255en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcManus, AM=7004635919en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike8699610-

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