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Article: Motivational readiness for active commuting by university students: Incentives and barriers

TitleMotivational readiness for active commuting by university students: Incentives and barriers
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAustralian Health Promotion Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.healthpromotion.org.au/journal/about_journal.php
Citation
Health Promotion Journal Of Australia, 2008, v. 19 n. 3, p. 210-215 How to Cite?
AbstractIssue addressed: Walking for transport can contribute significantly to health-enhancing physical activity. We examined the associations of stages of motivational readiness for active transport with perceived barriers and incentives to walking to and from university among students. Methods: Mail-back surveys were completed.by 781 students in a regional university in south-east Queensland. They identified one of eight options on motivational readiness for active commuting, which were then classified as: pre-contemplation; contemplation-preparation; or, action-maintenance. Open-ended questions were used to identify relevant barriers and incentives. Logistic regressions were used to examine the barriers and incentives that distinguished between those at different stages of motivational readiness. Results: Barriers most frequently reported were long travel distances, inconvenience and time constraints. Incentives most frequently reported were shorter travel distance, having more time, supportive infrastructure and better security. Those not considering active commuting (pre-contemplation) were significantly more likely to report shorter travel distance as an incentive compared to those in contemplation-preparation. Those in contemplation-preparation were significantly more likely to report lack of motivation, inadequate infrastructure, shorter travel distance and inconvenience as barriers; and, having more time, supportive infrastructure, social support and incentive programs as encouragement. Conclusions: Different barriers and incentives to walking to or from university exist for students in the different stages of motivational readiness for active commuting. Interventions targeted specifically to stage of motivational readiness may be potentially helpful in increasing activity levels, through active transport.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176053
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.231
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.606
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCole, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorDonald, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorNeller, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:45Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth Promotion Journal Of Australia, 2008, v. 19 n. 3, p. 210-215en_US
dc.identifier.issn1036-1073en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176053-
dc.description.abstractIssue addressed: Walking for transport can contribute significantly to health-enhancing physical activity. We examined the associations of stages of motivational readiness for active transport with perceived barriers and incentives to walking to and from university among students. Methods: Mail-back surveys were completed.by 781 students in a regional university in south-east Queensland. They identified one of eight options on motivational readiness for active commuting, which were then classified as: pre-contemplation; contemplation-preparation; or, action-maintenance. Open-ended questions were used to identify relevant barriers and incentives. Logistic regressions were used to examine the barriers and incentives that distinguished between those at different stages of motivational readiness. Results: Barriers most frequently reported were long travel distances, inconvenience and time constraints. Incentives most frequently reported were shorter travel distance, having more time, supportive infrastructure and better security. Those not considering active commuting (pre-contemplation) were significantly more likely to report shorter travel distance as an incentive compared to those in contemplation-preparation. Those in contemplation-preparation were significantly more likely to report lack of motivation, inadequate infrastructure, shorter travel distance and inconvenience as barriers; and, having more time, supportive infrastructure, social support and incentive programs as encouragement. Conclusions: Different barriers and incentives to walking to or from university exist for students in the different stages of motivational readiness for active commuting. Interventions targeted specifically to stage of motivational readiness may be potentially helpful in increasing activity levels, through active transport.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Health Promotion Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.healthpromotion.org.au/journal/about_journal.phpen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Promotion Journal of Australiaen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHabitsen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotionen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshQueenslanden_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacyen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.subject.meshStudents - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTransportation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshUniversitiesen_US
dc.subject.meshWalking - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleMotivational readiness for active commuting by university students: Incentives and barriersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid19053938-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-57749086742en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros165040-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-57749086742&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage210en_US
dc.identifier.epage215en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000261873100009-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCole, R=18435956000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeslie, E=7004928143en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDonald, M=7005178086en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNeller, A=6506787416en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOwen, N=7102307209en_US

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