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Article: Self-consciousness, perceived evaluation, and performance of a continuous motor task

TitleSelf-consciousness, perceived evaluation, and performance of a continuous motor task
Authors
KeywordsAnxiety
Driving Simulation
Performance Modulation
Self-Consciousness
Issue Date2008
PublisherEdizioni Luigi Pozzi srl. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijsp-online.com
Citation
International Journal Of Sport Psychology, 2008, v. 39 n. 3, p. 179-191 How to Cite?
AbstractAccording to some authors, highly self-conscious individuals are susceptible to performance breakdown in the presence of an evaluative audience (e.g., Maxwell, Masters, & Poolton, 2006), whereas other authors report less susceptibility (e.g., Baumeister, 1984). Previous studies have provided these contrasting results using discrete tasks. The aim of the current study was to ascertain whether self-consciousness is associated with changes to continuous task performance (simulated driving) in the presence and absence of an evaluative passenger, and to elucidate the direction of this relationship. Participants, classified as either high or low self-conscious (n = 14 in each group), performed seven 5-minute trials on a driving simulator. The first six trials (Practice Phase) were performed alone, whereas, the final trial (Observation Phase) was performed whilst observed. During the Practice Phase high self-conscious drivers were recorded engaging in riskier driving behaviours, relative to low self-conscious drivers. During the Observation Phase, high self-conscious drivers still displayed riskier driving behaviours than did low self-conscious drivers despite both groups' attempts to control the speed of their vehicles. The results imply that high trait self-consciousness, rather than low, appears to be associated with poorer task performance under both evaluative and non-evaluative conditions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176051
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.871
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.331
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JPen_US
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoolton, JMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:44Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Sport Psychology, 2008, v. 39 n. 3, p. 179-191en_US
dc.identifier.issn0047-0767en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176051-
dc.description.abstractAccording to some authors, highly self-conscious individuals are susceptible to performance breakdown in the presence of an evaluative audience (e.g., Maxwell, Masters, & Poolton, 2006), whereas other authors report less susceptibility (e.g., Baumeister, 1984). Previous studies have provided these contrasting results using discrete tasks. The aim of the current study was to ascertain whether self-consciousness is associated with changes to continuous task performance (simulated driving) in the presence and absence of an evaluative passenger, and to elucidate the direction of this relationship. Participants, classified as either high or low self-conscious (n = 14 in each group), performed seven 5-minute trials on a driving simulator. The first six trials (Practice Phase) were performed alone, whereas, the final trial (Observation Phase) was performed whilst observed. During the Practice Phase high self-conscious drivers were recorded engaging in riskier driving behaviours, relative to low self-conscious drivers. During the Observation Phase, high self-conscious drivers still displayed riskier driving behaviours than did low self-conscious drivers despite both groups' attempts to control the speed of their vehicles. The results imply that high trait self-consciousness, rather than low, appears to be associated with poorer task performance under both evaluative and non-evaluative conditions.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEdizioni Luigi Pozzi srl. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijsp-online.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Sport Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectAnxietyen_US
dc.subjectDriving Simulationen_US
dc.subjectPerformance Modulationen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Consciousnessen_US
dc.titleSelf-consciousness, perceived evaluation, and performance of a continuous motor tasken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPoolton, JM: jamiep@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPoolton, JM=rp00949en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-53249088292en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros152907-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-53249088292&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage179en_US
dc.identifier.epage191en_US
dc.publisher.placeItalyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaxwell, JP=7201610565en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoolton, JM=8921750800en_US

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