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Article: Explaining the effect of a 1-year intervention promoting physical activity in middle schools: A mediation analysis

TitleExplaining the effect of a 1-year intervention promoting physical activity in middle schools: A mediation analysis
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PHN
Citation
Public Health Nutrition, 2008, v. 11 n. 5, p. 501-512 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The aim of the present study was to examine the mediation effects of changes in psychosocial determinants of physical activity (attitude, social support, self-efficacy, perceived benefits and barriers) on changes in physical activity. Design: One-year intervention study with baseline and 1-year post measures of physical activity habits and psychosocial correlates. Setting: Fifteen middle schools. Subjects: Boys and girls (n = 2840) aged 11-15 years completed the validated questionnaires during class hours. Results: The product-of-coefficients test was used to asses the mediating effects. Self-efficacy for physical activity at school was found to be the only significant mediator of physical activity change. Specifically, self-efficacy for physical activity at school partly mediated the effect of the intervention on total and school-related physical activity change in the intervention group with parental support (P < 0.05). None of the other potential mediators, attitudes, social support, perceived benefits and perceived barriers, seemed to have had a positive effect. Even a suppressor effect was found for attitudes. Given that the effects of self-efficacy and attitudes were of opposite direction, the total mediated/suppressed effects of the intervention were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Positive changes in total and school-related physical activity in adolescents could be partly explained by increases in self-efficacy for physical activity at school through a physical activity intervention in middle schools with parental support. However, the suppressor effect of attitudes decreased this effect. As this is one of the first true mediation analyses in this age group, further research is needed to replicate the importance of these mediators. © 2007 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176044
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.433
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.995
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHaerens, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorMaes, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorCardon, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeforche, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Bourdeaudhuij, Ien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationPublic Health Nutrition, 2008, v. 11 n. 5, p. 501-512en_US
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176044-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aim of the present study was to examine the mediation effects of changes in psychosocial determinants of physical activity (attitude, social support, self-efficacy, perceived benefits and barriers) on changes in physical activity. Design: One-year intervention study with baseline and 1-year post measures of physical activity habits and psychosocial correlates. Setting: Fifteen middle schools. Subjects: Boys and girls (n = 2840) aged 11-15 years completed the validated questionnaires during class hours. Results: The product-of-coefficients test was used to asses the mediating effects. Self-efficacy for physical activity at school was found to be the only significant mediator of physical activity change. Specifically, self-efficacy for physical activity at school partly mediated the effect of the intervention on total and school-related physical activity change in the intervention group with parental support (P < 0.05). None of the other potential mediators, attitudes, social support, perceived benefits and perceived barriers, seemed to have had a positive effect. Even a suppressor effect was found for attitudes. Given that the effects of self-efficacy and attitudes were of opposite direction, the total mediated/suppressed effects of the intervention were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Positive changes in total and school-related physical activity in adolescents could be partly explained by increases in self-efficacy for physical activity at school through a physical activity intervention in middle schools with parental support. However, the suppressor effect of attitudes decreased this effect. As this is one of the first true mediation analyses in this age group, further research is needed to replicate the importance of these mediators. © 2007 The Authors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PHNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPublic Health Nutritionen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshExercise - Physiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotionen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychometricsen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacyen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.titleExplaining the effect of a 1-year intervention promoting physical activity in middle schools: A mediation analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S136898000700078Xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid17803839-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-42149161661en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-42149161661&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage501en_US
dc.identifier.epage512en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000255365800010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHaerens, L=15135602200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaes, L=7005829786en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCardon, G=7004013463en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeforche, B=6507791855en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Bourdeaudhuij, I=35510873600en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9978286-

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