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Article: A processual analysis of basic emotions and sources of concerns as they are lived before and after a competition

TitleA processual analysis of basic emotions and sources of concerns as they are lived before and after a competition
Authors
KeywordsAnxiety
Esm
Primary Appraisal
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsport
Citation
Psychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2006, v. 7 n. 3, p. 287-307 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine the natural flow of (a) pre- and post-competition temporal patterns of intensity, frequency and daily mean level (a composite measure of frequency and intensity) of basic emotions and (b) frequency of reports of competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns across time. Method: The Experience Sampling Method (ESM) was used, which permits the monitoring of the spontaneous flow of daily affective and cognitive experiences in the athletes' habitual environment. Thirty-nine male elite martial artists were assessed on 12 basic emotions and concerns at five random times a day across 1 week before and 3 days after a competition. On the competition day, the participants were assessed 1 h before and immediately after the contest. Results: Different patterns of change were observed for intensity and frequency of emotions and frequency of competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns. Frequency of fear was the most reactive affective component to competition vicinity. Increased frequency of some outcome-contingent negative emotions persisted for three days post-competition. The presence of negative emotions was the lowest in the post-competition days. Conclusions: This study confirms that, for a better understanding of the process of competitive stress, monitoring of both intensity and frequency of a wide range of emotions is needed. This research area may also benefit from analysing possible psychological spill-over between sport, competition and other life domains. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176028
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.605
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.303
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:36Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2006, v. 7 n. 3, p. 287-307en_US
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176028-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the natural flow of (a) pre- and post-competition temporal patterns of intensity, frequency and daily mean level (a composite measure of frequency and intensity) of basic emotions and (b) frequency of reports of competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns across time. Method: The Experience Sampling Method (ESM) was used, which permits the monitoring of the spontaneous flow of daily affective and cognitive experiences in the athletes' habitual environment. Thirty-nine male elite martial artists were assessed on 12 basic emotions and concerns at five random times a day across 1 week before and 3 days after a competition. On the competition day, the participants were assessed 1 h before and immediately after the contest. Results: Different patterns of change were observed for intensity and frequency of emotions and frequency of competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns. Frequency of fear was the most reactive affective component to competition vicinity. Increased frequency of some outcome-contingent negative emotions persisted for three days post-competition. The presence of negative emotions was the lowest in the post-competition days. Conclusions: This study confirms that, for a better understanding of the process of competitive stress, monitoring of both intensity and frequency of a wide range of emotions is needed. This research area may also benefit from analysing possible psychological spill-over between sport, competition and other life domains. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsporten_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology of Sport and Exerciseen_US
dc.subjectAnxietyen_US
dc.subjectEsmen_US
dc.subjectPrimary Appraisalen_US
dc.titleA processual analysis of basic emotions and sources of concerns as they are lived before and after a competitionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychsport.2005.07.002en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644834118en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros116002-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644834118&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage287en_US
dc.identifier.epage307en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237454900004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarnett, A=35195335800en_US

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