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Article: Lifetime risk of suicide ideation and attempts in an Australian community: Prevalence, suicidal process, and help-seeking behaviour

TitleLifetime risk of suicide ideation and attempts in an Australian community: Prevalence, suicidal process, and help-seeking behaviour
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
Citation
Journal Of Affective Disorders, 2005, v. 86 n. 2-3, p. 215-224 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The World Health Organisation SUicide PREvention-Multisite Intervention Study on Suicide (WHO/SUPRE-MISS) investigates suicidal behaviours in a number of nations. The feasibility of the different branches of the study was piloted in Queensland, Australia. This paper reports on the community survey component. Method: Randomised telephone interviews (n = 11,572) were conducted to determine the lifetime prevalence of suicidal ideation and attempts, and corresponding socio-demographic and cultural characteristics. A subsequent postal survey sent to consenting individuals reporting lifetime suicide ideation/attempt (n = 1311) was meant to ascertain the possible development of that behaviour along a continuum, psychiatric and psychological factors, suicidal transmission, help-seeking, and service utilisation. Results: Suicide ideation and attempts prevailed in individuals aged 25-44 years, and declined with increasing age. In most cases, suicidal experience/s did not develop over time with progressively increasing severity. Knowledge of someone else's suicidal behaviour significantly increased the risk of similar acts. Almost half of the subjects contended with their suicidal crisis by over-drinking alcohol, and 1/3 through other forms of reckless behaviour. The ratio completed/attempted suicide was 1 to 23. Less than 30% of subjects went to the hospital after their suicidal behaviour, and treatment received and staff attitudes were rated less favourably than that of General Practitioners. Conclusions: This survey provides a reliable picture of suicide ideation and behaviour in the general population. Information on the development of suicidal process, recklessness, and help-seeking attitudes may be valuable for future prevention strategies. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. Alrights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176026
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.57
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.927
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorSpathonis, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorBurgis, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:35Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Affective Disorders, 2005, v. 86 n. 2-3, p. 215-224en_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176026-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The World Health Organisation SUicide PREvention-Multisite Intervention Study on Suicide (WHO/SUPRE-MISS) investigates suicidal behaviours in a number of nations. The feasibility of the different branches of the study was piloted in Queensland, Australia. This paper reports on the community survey component. Method: Randomised telephone interviews (n = 11,572) were conducted to determine the lifetime prevalence of suicidal ideation and attempts, and corresponding socio-demographic and cultural characteristics. A subsequent postal survey sent to consenting individuals reporting lifetime suicide ideation/attempt (n = 1311) was meant to ascertain the possible development of that behaviour along a continuum, psychiatric and psychological factors, suicidal transmission, help-seeking, and service utilisation. Results: Suicide ideation and attempts prevailed in individuals aged 25-44 years, and declined with increasing age. In most cases, suicidal experience/s did not develop over time with progressively increasing severity. Knowledge of someone else's suicidal behaviour significantly increased the risk of similar acts. Almost half of the subjects contended with their suicidal crisis by over-drinking alcohol, and 1/3 through other forms of reckless behaviour. The ratio completed/attempted suicide was 1 to 23. Less than 30% of subjects went to the hospital after their suicidal behaviour, and treatment received and staff attitudes were rated less favourably than that of General Practitioners. Conclusions: This survey provides a reliable picture of suicide ideation and behaviour in the general population. Information on the development of suicidal process, recklessness, and help-seeking attitudes may be valuable for future prevention strategies. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. Alrights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jaden_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Affective Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAustralia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCause Of Deathen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLife Change Eventsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance Of Health Care - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Inventoryen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSuicide - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshSuicide, Attempted - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.titleLifetime risk of suicide ideation and attempts in an Australian community: Prevalence, suicidal process, and help-seeking behaviouren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2005.02.001en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15935241-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-20344387440en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-20344387440&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume86en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-3en_US
dc.identifier.spage215en_US
dc.identifier.epage224en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229879400012-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Leo, D=7006128644en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpathonis, K=16481526300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBurgis, S=13905650400en_US

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