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Article: Is the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) appropriate for studying pre-competitive emotions?

TitleIs the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) appropriate for studying pre-competitive emotions?
Authors
KeywordsAffect
Competition
Csai-2
Martial Arts
Research Methods
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsport
Citation
Psychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2001, v. 2 n. 1, p. 27-45 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To examine whether the implementation of the Experience Sampling Method (ESM), which involves a substantial number of frequent repeated measurements, may artificially increase intensity of negative emotions and cognitive intrusion and affect temporal patterns of pre-competitive emotions. Design: Intensity and temporal patterns of pre-competitive affects obtained via the ESM and less intrusive methodologies were compared. These were retrospective assessment and the conventional time-to-competition paradigm involving four repeated momentary measurements. Because retrospective assessments can be affected by memory distortions, recall accuracy was analysed. Methods: Male tae-kwon-do practitioners (n=66), facing a major competition, were randomised into three groups: an ESM, a repeated measurements (RM), and a retrospective assessment (RA) group. They were assessed on pre-competitive emotions and cognitive intrusion. The ESM group was assessed at three random times a day across 1 week before the competition and 1 h pre-competition. The RM group was assessed 7 days, 4 days, 1 day, and 1 h before the competition. These two groups were also assessed retrospectively two days after the competition. The RA group was assessed retrospectively two days after the event. Results: Repeated measures MANOVAs revealed no differences in level and temporal patterns of emotions between the ESM and RM group. The ESM group reported less momentary cognitive intrusion than the RM group. Between-group differences in recalled positive affects and within-group differences between momentary and retrospective assessments of negative affect and cognitive intrusion were observed. Conclusions: The ESM does not produce priming effects and can be used for accurate analysis of the dynamics of pre-competitive emotions. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176020
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.605
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.303
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorSzabo, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2001, v. 2 n. 1, p. 27-45en_US
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176020-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To examine whether the implementation of the Experience Sampling Method (ESM), which involves a substantial number of frequent repeated measurements, may artificially increase intensity of negative emotions and cognitive intrusion and affect temporal patterns of pre-competitive emotions. Design: Intensity and temporal patterns of pre-competitive affects obtained via the ESM and less intrusive methodologies were compared. These were retrospective assessment and the conventional time-to-competition paradigm involving four repeated momentary measurements. Because retrospective assessments can be affected by memory distortions, recall accuracy was analysed. Methods: Male tae-kwon-do practitioners (n=66), facing a major competition, were randomised into three groups: an ESM, a repeated measurements (RM), and a retrospective assessment (RA) group. They were assessed on pre-competitive emotions and cognitive intrusion. The ESM group was assessed at three random times a day across 1 week before the competition and 1 h pre-competition. The RM group was assessed 7 days, 4 days, 1 day, and 1 h before the competition. These two groups were also assessed retrospectively two days after the competition. The RA group was assessed retrospectively two days after the event. Results: Repeated measures MANOVAs revealed no differences in level and temporal patterns of emotions between the ESM and RM group. The ESM group reported less momentary cognitive intrusion than the RM group. Between-group differences in recalled positive affects and within-group differences between momentary and retrospective assessments of negative affect and cognitive intrusion were observed. Conclusions: The ESM does not produce priming effects and can be used for accurate analysis of the dynamics of pre-competitive emotions. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsporten_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology of Sport and Exerciseen_US
dc.subjectAffecten_US
dc.subjectCompetitionen_US
dc.subjectCsai-2en_US
dc.subjectMartial Artsen_US
dc.subjectResearch Methodsen_US
dc.titleIs the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) appropriate for studying pre-competitive emotions?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1469-0292(00)00009-1en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0042328611en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0042328611&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage27en_US
dc.identifier.epage45en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSzabo, A=8719927800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, C=7406218617en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10460340-

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