File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The effects of secondary tasks on implicit motor skill performance

TitleThe effects of secondary tasks on implicit motor skill performance
Authors
KeywordsDual-Task
Implicit
Motor
Performance
Stress
Issue Date2002
PublisherEdizioni Luigi Pozzi srl. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijsp-online.com
Citation
International Journal Of Sport Psychology, 2002, v. 33 n. 3, p. 307-324 How to Cite?
AbstractAcquiring a skill in an implicit manner is thought to have a number of advantages over acquiring the same skill explicitly. In particular, implicitly learnt skills have been shown to be more durable over time and more robust to the influence of psychological stress. Implicit motor skill learning has been demonstrated on several occasions using a concurrent secondary task to curb explicit rule formation. On each occasion the benefits of learning the skill implicitly have been robustness under psychological stress, with the learners less likely to exhibit skill breakdown. The secondary task employed to curb explicit rule formation has been one that loads on the central executive component of working memory. The primary difficulty with the use of this task has been a consequent decrement in performance as a result of the attentional demands of the central executive task intruding upon execution of the motor skill. This paper examines whether less intrusive, non-central executive, phonological loop secondary tasks prevent explicit knowledge formation whilst not impacting adversely upon performance of the primary skill. Two experiments were performed, the results of which demonstrate that phonological loop tasks do not prevent explicit knowledge acquisition. This suggests that the phonological loop is not an essential component in the development of explicit knowledge regarding a motor task. The problem of finding a secondary task to block explicit knowledge formation whilst not interfering with motor performance remains.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176017
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.871
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.331
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMacmahon, KMAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Sport Psychology, 2002, v. 33 n. 3, p. 307-324en_US
dc.identifier.issn0047-0767en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176017-
dc.description.abstractAcquiring a skill in an implicit manner is thought to have a number of advantages over acquiring the same skill explicitly. In particular, implicitly learnt skills have been shown to be more durable over time and more robust to the influence of psychological stress. Implicit motor skill learning has been demonstrated on several occasions using a concurrent secondary task to curb explicit rule formation. On each occasion the benefits of learning the skill implicitly have been robustness under psychological stress, with the learners less likely to exhibit skill breakdown. The secondary task employed to curb explicit rule formation has been one that loads on the central executive component of working memory. The primary difficulty with the use of this task has been a consequent decrement in performance as a result of the attentional demands of the central executive task intruding upon execution of the motor skill. This paper examines whether less intrusive, non-central executive, phonological loop secondary tasks prevent explicit knowledge formation whilst not impacting adversely upon performance of the primary skill. Two experiments were performed, the results of which demonstrate that phonological loop tasks do not prevent explicit knowledge acquisition. This suggests that the phonological loop is not an essential component in the development of explicit knowledge regarding a motor task. The problem of finding a secondary task to block explicit knowledge formation whilst not interfering with motor performance remains.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEdizioni Luigi Pozzi srl. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijsp-online.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Sport Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectDual-Tasken_US
dc.subjectImpliciten_US
dc.subjectMotoren_US
dc.subjectPerformanceen_US
dc.subjectStressen_US
dc.titleThe effects of secondary tasks on implicit motor skill performanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036658299en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036658299&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume33en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage307en_US
dc.identifier.epage324en_US
dc.publisher.placeItalyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacMahon, KMA=6602795331en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats