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Article: Lysozyme gene expression in inflammatory bowel disease

TitleLysozyme gene expression in inflammatory bowel disease
Authors
Issue Date1992
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
Gastroenterology, 1992, v. 103 n. 2, p. 532-538 How to Cite?
AbstractRiboprobe in situ hybridization (rISH) demonstrates active lysozyme synthesis in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Maximal labeling was seen in Paneth cells, macrophages, and granulomas. Diffuse infiltration of the mucosa by lysozyme-rich polymorphs characterizes ulcerative colitis but obscures reactivity in other cell lineages in immunohistochemical studies; lysozyme mRNA is not detected in polymorphs, rISH giving a clearer picture than immunohistochemical studies of the active synthesis of lysozyme within the gut in inflammatory bowel disease. In ulcerative colitis, strong signals localized to Paneth cell metaplasia were found in 11 of 20 cases and to a lesser degree in non-Paneth cell lineages in regenerative mucosa in 13 of 20 cases. In Crohn's disease, abundant labeling was seen in tuberculoid granulomas (5 of 20) and over macrophage aggregates in the lamina propria in another 7, characteristic patterns not encountered in ulcerative colitis. Low levels of lysozyme messenger RNA were found in the ulceration-associated cell lineage ('pseudopyloric metaplasia'). These results support the view that neutrophils are largely responsible for elevated fecal lysozyme levels in ulcerative colitis and macrophages for elevated serum lysozyme levels in Crohn's disease.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176001
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStamp, GWHen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoulsom, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorKeshav, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorJeffery, REen_US
dc.contributor.authorLongcroft, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorPignatelli, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, NAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:04Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterology, 1992, v. 103 n. 2, p. 532-538en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176001-
dc.description.abstractRiboprobe in situ hybridization (rISH) demonstrates active lysozyme synthesis in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Maximal labeling was seen in Paneth cells, macrophages, and granulomas. Diffuse infiltration of the mucosa by lysozyme-rich polymorphs characterizes ulcerative colitis but obscures reactivity in other cell lineages in immunohistochemical studies; lysozyme mRNA is not detected in polymorphs, rISH giving a clearer picture than immunohistochemical studies of the active synthesis of lysozyme within the gut in inflammatory bowel disease. In ulcerative colitis, strong signals localized to Paneth cell metaplasia were found in 11 of 20 cases and to a lesser degree in non-Paneth cell lineages in regenerative mucosa in 13 of 20 cases. In Crohn's disease, abundant labeling was seen in tuberculoid granulomas (5 of 20) and over macrophage aggregates in the lamina propria in another 7, characteristic patterns not encountered in ulcerative colitis. Low levels of lysozyme messenger RNA were found in the ulceration-associated cell lineage ('pseudopyloric metaplasia'). These results support the view that neutrophils are largely responsible for elevated fecal lysozyme levels in ulcerative colitis and macrophages for elevated serum lysozyme levels in Crohn's disease.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_US
dc.subject.meshColitis, Ulcerative - Enzymologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCrohn Disease - Enzymologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Expressionen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshInflammatory Bowel Diseases - Enzymology - Genetics - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMuramidase - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshNucleic Acid Hybridizationen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Messenger - Analysisen_US
dc.titleLysozyme gene expression in inflammatory bowel diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChung, LP: lpchung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChung, LP=rp00249en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1634071-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026663420en_US
dc.identifier.volume103en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage532en_US
dc.identifier.epage538en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992JF01400022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStamp, GWH=7006020322en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoulsom, R=7005125185en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, LP=24315879100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKeshav, S=7003367734en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJeffery, RE=7102699665en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLongcroft, JA=6602453712en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPignatelli, M=7005888416en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWright, NA=7201531909en_US

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