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Article: Psychopathological syndromes in the functional psychoses: Associations with course and outcome

TitlePsychopathological syndromes in the functional psychoses: Associations with course and outcome
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 1996, v. 26 n. 1, p. 161-176 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of this study was to identify underlying dimensions of psychopathology in a cohort of patients with functional psychosis of recent onset, and to examine their prognostic value. Factor analysis of the psychopathological features of 166 consecutively admitted patients with functional psychosis of recent onset revealed seven psychopathological dimensions, which explained 63% of the variance. Five of these seven syndromes bore differential associations with subsequent treatment and illness course, independent of: (i) associations with DSM-III-R diagnosis; (ii) associations with other prognostic factors; and (iii) associations with the baseline values of outcome variables. The most striking associations were shown for an early and insidious onset syndrome with affective flattening, which predicted a more disabled course of illness on three of four outcome dimensions, and which was more common in males and unmarried individuals. A second syndrome, characterized by bizarre behaviour, inappropriate affect, catatonia, and poor rapport showed similar, slightly less striking, associations with illness course, as well as with poor pre-morbid social functioning. A third syndrome, characterized by positive psychotic symptoms was to a lesser degree associated with poorer outcome, whereas a fourth syndrome distinguished by manic symptomatology predicted a more benign illness course. A fifth syndrome identified by lack of insight predicted more time in hospital and admission under a section of the Mental Health Act during the follow-up period. A further finding was that dimensional representations of psychopathological features were considerably more useful than categorical representations DSM-III-R and ICD-10) as predictors of illness course and treatment decisions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175995
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVan Os, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorFahy, TAen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorBebbington, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorToone, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:03:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:03:36Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 1996, v. 26 n. 1, p. 161-176en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175995-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to identify underlying dimensions of psychopathology in a cohort of patients with functional psychosis of recent onset, and to examine their prognostic value. Factor analysis of the psychopathological features of 166 consecutively admitted patients with functional psychosis of recent onset revealed seven psychopathological dimensions, which explained 63% of the variance. Five of these seven syndromes bore differential associations with subsequent treatment and illness course, independent of: (i) associations with DSM-III-R diagnosis; (ii) associations with other prognostic factors; and (iii) associations with the baseline values of outcome variables. The most striking associations were shown for an early and insidious onset syndrome with affective flattening, which predicted a more disabled course of illness on three of four outcome dimensions, and which was more common in males and unmarried individuals. A second syndrome, characterized by bizarre behaviour, inappropriate affect, catatonia, and poor rapport showed similar, slightly less striking, associations with illness course, as well as with poor pre-morbid social functioning. A third syndrome, characterized by positive psychotic symptoms was to a lesser degree associated with poorer outcome, whereas a fourth syndrome distinguished by manic symptomatology predicted a more benign illness course. A fifth syndrome identified by lack of insight predicted more time in hospital and admission under a section of the Mental Health Act during the follow-up period. A further finding was that dimensional representations of psychopathological features were considerably more useful than categorical representations DSM-III-R and ICD-10) as predictors of illness course and treatment decisions.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders - Diagnosis - Psychology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titlePsychopathological syndromes in the functional psychoses: Associations with course and outcomeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291700033808-
dc.identifier.pmid8643756-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-9044223658en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-9044223658&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage161en_US
dc.identifier.epage176en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996TT00900015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Os, J=7102358027en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFahy, TA=8077630100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, P=36078972900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHarvey, I=7103367222en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLewis, S=7404041267en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBebbington, P=7102209922en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridToone, B=7006068925en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, M=24395495900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, R=35406239400en_US

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