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Article: The genetic and environmental influences of event-related gamma oscillations on bipolar disorder

TitleThe genetic and environmental influences of event-related gamma oscillations on bipolar disorder
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BDI
Citation
Bipolar Disorders, 2011, v. 13 n. 3, p. 260-271 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Gamma oscillations have been proposed to play an important role in neural information coding. There have been a limited number of electrophysiology studies in evoked gamma band responses (GBRs) in bipolar disorder (BPD). It is also unclear whether GBR deficits, if present, are potential endophenotypes for BPD as little is known about the heritability of GBRs. The present study aimed to examine whether GBRs derived from two auditory tasks, the oddball task and the dual-click paradigm, are potential BPD endophenotypes. Methods: A total of 308 subjects were included in this study: 198 healthy controls, 59 BPD patients (22 monozygotic BPD twins and 37 BPD patients from 31 families), and 51 unaffected relatives. The evoked gamma responses were calculated using a Morlet wavelet transformation. Structural equation modelling was applied to obtain the genetic (heritability) and environment estimates in each GBR variable and their (genetic) overlap with BPD. Results: The heritability estimates of GBR to standard stimuli were 0.51 and 0.35 to target stimuli in the oddball task. However, neither response type was impaired in BPD patients or their unaffected relatives. The heritability estimates of GBR to S1 stimuli were 0.54 and 0.50 to S2 stimuli in the dual-click paradigm. BPD patients had reduced gamma power and suppression to S1 stimuli but their unaffected relatives did not. Conclusions: Evoked GBRs are heritable traits. However, GBR deficits are not observed in clinically unaffected relatives nor associated with BPD. Gamma responses do not appear to satisfy criteria for being BPD endophenotypes. © 2011 John Wiley and Sons A/S.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175985
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.882
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.592
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHall, MHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, KMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchulze, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorMcdonald, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorKalidindi, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorKravariti, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorKane, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_US
dc.contributor.authorBramon, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorRijsdijk, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:03:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:03:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationBipolar Disorders, 2011, v. 13 n. 3, p. 260-271en_US
dc.identifier.issn1398-5647en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175985-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Gamma oscillations have been proposed to play an important role in neural information coding. There have been a limited number of electrophysiology studies in evoked gamma band responses (GBRs) in bipolar disorder (BPD). It is also unclear whether GBR deficits, if present, are potential endophenotypes for BPD as little is known about the heritability of GBRs. The present study aimed to examine whether GBRs derived from two auditory tasks, the oddball task and the dual-click paradigm, are potential BPD endophenotypes. Methods: A total of 308 subjects were included in this study: 198 healthy controls, 59 BPD patients (22 monozygotic BPD twins and 37 BPD patients from 31 families), and 51 unaffected relatives. The evoked gamma responses were calculated using a Morlet wavelet transformation. Structural equation modelling was applied to obtain the genetic (heritability) and environment estimates in each GBR variable and their (genetic) overlap with BPD. Results: The heritability estimates of GBR to standard stimuli were 0.51 and 0.35 to target stimuli in the oddball task. However, neither response type was impaired in BPD patients or their unaffected relatives. The heritability estimates of GBR to S1 stimuli were 0.54 and 0.50 to S2 stimuli in the dual-click paradigm. BPD patients had reduced gamma power and suppression to S1 stimuli but their unaffected relatives did not. Conclusions: Evoked GBRs are heritable traits. However, GBR deficits are not observed in clinically unaffected relatives nor associated with BPD. Gamma responses do not appear to satisfy criteria for being BPD endophenotypes. © 2011 John Wiley and Sons A/S.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BDIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBipolar Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshAcoustic Stimulation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - Genetics - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshDiscrimination (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshDiseases In Twinsen_US
dc.subject.meshElectroencephalography - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmenten_US
dc.subject.meshEvoked Potentials, Auditory - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFamilyen_US
dc.subject.meshFamily Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshTwins, Dizygotic - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshTwins, Monozygotic - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleThe genetic and environmental influences of event-related gamma oscillations on bipolar disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1399-5618.2011.00925.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid21676129-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959281164en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959281164&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage260en_US
dc.identifier.epage271en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292666000005-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHall, MH=14013171900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpencer, KM=7202053143en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchulze, K=7103137549en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcdonald, C=8749594800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKalidindi, S=24366595400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKravariti, E=8855469000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKane, F=24829114900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBramon, E=8089378900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRijsdijk, F=6701830835en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9431729-

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